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Highland - Theory
Definition of a curtsy
By SeniorLadyPremium member Comments: 8103, member since Sun Aug 24, 2003
On Mon Dec 31, 2012 04:55 PM

I am preparing for my national associate with BATD and was surprised to find that there is no definition of a curtsy in my textbook. I'm certain that one exists and was wondering if anyone had any official wording from the powers that be in Scotland. I would specifically like to confirm whether the WF is pointed or placed on the half point. Thanks.

5 Replies to Definition of a curtsy

re: Definition of a curtsy
By batd_teacherPremium member Comments: 2551, member since Mon Feb 23, 2004
On Mon Dec 31, 2012 10:15 PM
Just went through all my books to be able to discover the proper terminology and lo and behold, lol, nothing.

I have always taught the dancers to have the working foot arrive on the point. A half point, would indicate to me that there would be a transference of weight, or distribution of weight divided between both feet in preparation for a specific movement of elevation or travelling.

That being said for the most part, in Nationals you either, after completing the "dip" part of the curtsey, return to 1st position by stepping to 2nd position with the left foot, bringing the right foot to 1st either rising on the balls of both feet or flat, or there is the 1/8th pivot on the LF pointing RF to 4th or 4th Intermediate depending on the dance.

Hope I didn't muddle that too much.
re: Definition of a curtsy
By emilyruth07 Comments: 63, member since Thu Jun 23, 2011
On Mon Dec 31, 2012 10:33 PM
The SDTA National book has a definition of:
CURSTEY - Step to right with RF flat, place LF to 3rd rear position on 1/2 point bending both knees.

Hope this helps a little bit.
re: Definition of a curtsy
By SeniorLadyPremium member Comments: 8103, member since Sun Aug 24, 2003
On Tue Jan 01, 2013 08:04 AM
Thanks to you both. Just to clarify, curtsy refers only to the actual movement itself and not any of the steps that precede or follow, correct? Those would be part of the introduction?
re: Definition of a curtsy
By punkqueeniemember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 1345, member since Tue Dec 17, 2002
On Wed Jan 02, 2013 06:40 AM
My thought is that the step before is part of the curtsy because one always does it. The movement afterwards (whether closing/rising/pointing) is just part of the intro.

Just my interpretation.
re: Definition of a curtsy
By emilyruth07 Comments: 63, member since Thu Jun 23, 2011
On Thu Jan 03, 2013 06:34 AM
I just checked through my SDTA book. All the introductions that are not danced in the kilt say "Step to right and bow or curtsey..." then say either step back and rise, pivot 1/8th turn, etc.
I would say the definition of the curtsey given in the SDTA book refers to the step before the curtsey and the movement. If I were to describe only a curtsey I would just say with the RF flat put the LF in 3rd rear on the half point and bend both knees. However I also agree with punkqueenie that you never do a curtsey in a dance without the step to the right before it. So I don't think you would be wrong if you included the step before or not.

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