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Politics & Current Affairs
DOMA struck down.
By kandykanePremium member Comments: 16415, member since Mon May 01, 2006
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 08:15 AM

The US Supreme Court has ruled in favor of marriage equality. At long last!

kk~

15 Replies to DOMA struck down.

re: DOMA struck down.
By slice Comments: 1247, member since Fri Oct 15, 2004
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 09:01 AM
Between DOMA and Wendy Davis's filibuster in Texas there have been some big victories this week!

Unfortunately, also some major setbacks considering the same Supreme Court has also eradicated some critical segments of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
re: DOMA struck down.
By kandykanePremium member Comments: 16415, member since Mon May 01, 2006
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 09:07 AM
^ Yes, it was exciting last night in Texas. I was watching.

This is a partial victory. They sent Prop 8 back down. Which means legalizing gay marriage is still in the hands of the states. However, for those states who have legalized it, those people will now get benefits. And pressure is sure to mount for those states who have not legalized gay marriage.

It's insulting to live in a state that has not legalized gay marriage, especially as someone with memories of segregation. Makes me wonder where their heads are. Oh, wait... I know where they are. ;)

kk~
re: DOMA struck down.
By Dancing_EMTmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 3466, member since Wed Dec 08, 2004
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 11:38 AM



My husband and I went to the lake yesterday. I wore this shirt with pride. I love him with pride, others should love their partner with pride as well. Love is love! I can't wrap my head around why it matters who marries who as long as everyone involved are consenting adults. Seriously, who CARES?!
re: DOMA struck down.
By Sumayah Comments: 6879, member since Wed Nov 12, 2008
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 11:38 AM
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2013-06-26 11:49:49
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2013-06-26 11:50:40
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2013-06-26 11:52:35 trying to make this all legible
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2013-06-26 11:53:22
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2013-06-26 12:11:40
Last night when Sen. Leticia Van de Putte dropped this line out, "At what point must a female senator raise her hand to be recognized over her male colleagues in the room?"

BOOM.

The cheering started and kept up for some 20 minutes. I'm pretty sure everyone on my Twitter feed had the same slack-jawed expression of glee for that burn. Here's a recounting of the events (not family friendly language included) for those who didn't see. I'm happy that today, I still control my body in Texas. And cheers to Senator Wendy Davis for her amazing filibuster and to Senators Van De Putte, Hinojosa, and Watson for holding their own.

This morning I woke up to see on my feed that DOMA was dead and the Prop 8 was effectively killed as well (it wasn't official at that point) and frankly I can't stop smiling. This is a good day for basic human rights. Well, it is with voting issues aside.

But I swear I've never paid more attention to politics than I have in the past 24 hours. Interestingly, social media is pulling through with having the best information. The journalists live tweeting and people participating with informed statements have made Twitter far better than the news for news.

Here's some examples:

While the excitement of Texas Senate Bill 5 was going down - the cheering, the voting, the time travel - what was CNN covering?
twitter wrote:

History is being made in #Texas, while @CNN talks about blueberry muffins. LITERALLY. #sb5


Regarding the DOMA and Prop 8 deaths?
twitter wrote:

I love Twitter because it's all, "On pg. 15 of the decision," and "History shows..." but trad-news is still, "Something-something Paula Deen."


On the Ustream I was watching last night of the Texas coverage, a commenter wrote: "this shows the importance of social media, because no one else is covering this except social media." And it's true. Sad but true. CNN and other news agencies definitely had their priorities skewed. Here's hoping they can get their stuff together and actually cover world events and important issues instead of calorie counting their breakfasts.

Regarding the repeal of a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, that is going to be worth watching, especially as Texas jumped right on that with enthusiasm. I really like this quote:
Justices Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan dissented. Ginsberg wrote, "The sad irony of today's decision lies in its utter failure to grasp why the VRA has proven effective... Throwing out preclearance when it has worked and is continuing to work to stop discriminatory changes is like throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet."

www.theatlanticwire.com . . .

The 60's weren't that long ago and considering we're still fighting for *basic* human rights - the right to marry and be allowed the same governmental provisions, the right for women to decide what happens inside their own body - I think it's a definitely step backwards. The protection was there for a reason, the reason being for as much as we want to believe that racism is gone, it's not. Not by a long shot. Not in the south. And this sort of maneuvering is not going to help nor protect the constituents who need it. Our state and national governments are run by too many old, out of touch, white guys. I sincerely hope the amendments get revoked or they figure out a way to offer that much needed protection again.
re: DOMA struck down.
By shmcdona Comments: 857, member since Sat May 01, 2004
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 01:29 PM
Couldn't be happier for the people south of the Border! Huge cheers from Canada! Congratulations on these important victories. I still can't believe what happened in Texas though. Insane
re: DOMA struck down.
By kandykanePremium member Comments: 16415, member since Mon May 01, 2006
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 02:47 PM
OMG, it was so exciting! If the issue goes to a special session, I'm going down there. We could meet up, Sumayah!

kk~
re: DOMA struck down.
By Chaconnemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 6359, member since Thu Jul 12, 2007
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 04:37 PM
Don't get too giddy over these two rulings. Like many things this court does these decisions were on rather narrow grounds. The Prob 8 overturn only applies to California and what it actually does is affirm a lower court ruling that already overturned Prop 8 on the narrow grounds that the folks who appealed the lower court ruling had "no standing" to bring the appeal.

The DOMA part addresses only the Federal Government's role in the DOMA and will apply to things like same sex benefits in the military the Civil Service, and federal benefits. It most certainly does not mean that people are free to marry whomever they please in all 50 states.

Marriage is defined by each state and that still is true for the moment. There are about a dozen states (mine, Maryland, being one of them) which permit same sex marriage by either legislative or court action. It is still not possible, even with today's ruling to have a same sex marriage in neighboring Virginia which specifically bans it by law and in many other states who (unwisely) have a male-female definition of marriage in their state constitutions. There are still powerful forces at work who will still try to prevent this by whatever means they can, though it may be more difficult to do so.

I applaud the decision, though I am a bit surprised by which justices approved it (well, surprised that Roberts went along with it, but Roberts has a habit of deciding things on the narrowest of legal grounds.)

It is a step in the right direction, but for the moment only a step.

Jon
re: DOMA struck down.
By PinUpGirlmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 25878, member since Tue Jul 16, 2002
On Wed Jun 26, 2013 06:22 PM
Jon-As the cliche goes, the journey of 1000 miles begins with a single step. And today that step was made.

Georgia will definitely be one of the last to legalize it (along with marijuana which I also believe will happen in my lifetime), but it'll happen. I'm a firm believer that the good will always win out. The founding fathers certainly wouldn't have agreed with politicians religious beliefs dictating their legislative decisions. They thought religion was stupid, to put it lightly. Separation of church and state exists for a reason. If you believe that homosexuality or abortion are sins, cool. Go find a church that agrees with you and that church is free to not perform same sex marriages or encourage abortion. Don't force your beliefs on other people. That's just tacky.
re: DOMA struck down.
By MarlaSingermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 3906, member since Fri Jul 25, 2008
On Thu Jun 27, 2013 07:17 AM
Indiana's reaction was basically, "Awesome, they're still leaving this up to each state to decide, so now we can go ahead with passing that bill to amend our constitution to ban gay marriage like we always wanted to!" :? But it's going to get put on a referendum, so there's hope. Latest polling suggests that a slim majority of Hoosiers do not want the amendment, although I attribute some of that the fact that we are fiercely libertarian around here.

So no, yesterday's decisions weren't exactly a slam dunk, but they sure were a step in the right direction. Yesterday the Court acknowledged the fact that if you're legally married, then you're legally married, period, and no marriage is deserving of fewer benefits or protections under the law just because of the sex of the parties involved. In my mind, that is such a huge step forward toward ending institutionalized discrimination toward LGBT individuals.
re: DOMA struck down.
By panicmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 11592, member since Thu Dec 16, 2004
On Thu Jun 27, 2013 06:03 PM
The narrow decision wasn't unexpected since a few of the justices have discussed how sweeping judgments on social issues (ie abortion) have actually harmed the issue's momentum. In about three years, the court will probably start to see some broader cases on gay marriage. I believe the liberal justices wanted to give the legislature that extra time to keep doing what it's doing. If opinion polls keep trending the same way, public support for gay marriage will be overwhelming in 3 years. Fingers crossed.
re: DOMA struck down.
By Chaconnemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 6359, member since Thu Jul 12, 2007
On Thu Jun 27, 2013 08:05 PM
Here in Maryland, the gay marriage issue was passed in the legislature and was signed by the governor. It was petitioned to referendum (something ridiculously easy to do in this state.) Along with some other contentious issues (redistricting, in-state tuition for certain undocumented immigrants) all three referenda were defeated at the polls, meaning the laws remained as approved. There were attempts to petition to referendum two issues approved in the state legislature this year (Death Penalty Repeal and a limited gun control measure.) Both failed even to get the comparatively small numbers of signatures (about 50K) to petition an issue to a vote. Now admittedly Maryland is one of the most Liberal and solidly Democratic states in the Union (We have two very major urban centers, Baltimore and environs and the Washington, DC suburbs.)

Jon
re: DOMA struck down.
By Tansey Comments: 2367, member since Fri Mar 27, 2009
On Thu Jun 27, 2013 08:32 PM
Edited by Tansey (209516) on 2013-06-27 20:37:44
Edited by Tansey (209516) on 2013-06-27 20:50:02
^I was surprised Maryland was so late to the party. Same-sex marriage has been legal here in Massachusetts since 2004 so it seems odd that the rest of the country isn't on board. I thought it would come to Maryland sooner than it did. At least Maryland legalized it, unlike most of the rest of the country.
A young friend spent 3 days in front of the Supreme Court waiting for news this week, usually waving his rainbow flag. He was all over the news. He also is pictured running with the printed decision across the court steps. We're all really proud of him.
www.usnews.com . . .
re: DOMA struck down.
By kandykanePremium member Comments: 16415, member since Mon May 01, 2006
On Thu Jun 27, 2013 09:08 PM
I have hope Texas will get on board eventually, but we have to turn blue first. And after what happened Tuesday night, that may be sooner than I thought. It's entirely possible Perry and his cronies will railroad SB5 through the second special session, but state elections are next year. And the way they tried to falsify the time on the vote may be enough for the state to finally say "ENOUGH!"

Civil rights is certainly a hot topic this week between the DOMA ruling, the Texas filibuster and Paula Deen's empire crumbling. Lets hope the momentum keeps going!

kk~
re: DOMA struck down.
By UberGoobermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 6414, member since Sat May 15, 2004
On Thu Jun 27, 2013 09:22 PM
As someone who lives in a state that has legalized gay marriage (Go Iowa!) yesterday was unbelievably exciting. Now all the married couples here can get their fed benefits! So exciting :) I have two gay friends very dear to me who chose to announce their engagement publicly yesterday amidst the celebrations!
re: DOMA struck down. (karma: 1)
By Chaconnemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 6359, member since Thu Jul 12, 2007
On Fri Jun 28, 2013 10:20 AM
Tansey wrote:

^I was surprised Maryland was so late to the party. Same-sex marriage has been legal here in Massachusetts since 2004 so it seems odd that the rest of the country isn't on board. I thought it would come to Maryland sooner than it did. At least Maryland legalized it, unlike most of the rest of the country.



This had to do with some unique situations in Maryland politics and Maryland demographics. Bills for same sex marriage had been in the Maryland legislature for several years, but were stalled in the Judicial Committee ("Where all bills go to die") and a very recalcitrant committee chairman who seems to be against most progressive legislation in general and same sex marriage in particular.

The bill was also opposed vigorously by African American ministers in addition to the usual suspects on the Religious Right plus the Roman Catholic clergy. African American preachers wield an enormous amount of power in Baltimore city and Prince Georges County, two "majority minority" jurisdictions. African Americans also are over 20% of the states population, the highest percentage outside the Deep South. Maryland also has a very substantial number of other denominations historically opposed to same sex marriage, notably Roman Catholic and Baptist. They, along with so other well-organized denominations were the prime forces were the prime supporters of Prop. 8 in California Finally two highly influential politicians, the Lieutenant Governor and the County Executive (the closest thing we have to mayors in Maryland)of PG County came out very strongly in favor of same sex marriage. Both gentlemen are African American. This blunted the calls from the pulpits to oppose the measure. The Governor, always a supporter, put an extraordinary amount of pressure on the legislature and we helped by a key suburban Republican State Senator (the GOP generally opposed the measure, more because most are from rural areas which are quite conservative rather than on ideological grounds.) There was a floor vote in the entire state legislature, a rare move, to circumvent the obstructionist chairman of the Judiciary Committee and move the bill out of the committee before they voted on it or even considered it. Once it got to the entire legislature, it won solid approval and the governor quickly signed the measure. The governor was unlikely to spend so much political capital until he was safely reelected to a second term.

There are still forces opposed to it in the state. A guest minister at my own church mentioned his disappointment that Maryland voters defeated a referendum calling for repeal. He has not been invited back. [I do believe that my church's official position at the national level opposes same sex marriage, but our regular minister is smart enough not to make an issue of it. He has never said anything on the topic. I personally don't think much of many national policies of my church, but it is the only game in town of that denomination to which I have strong historic ties, though I would prefer belonging to a different and far more liberal branch of that church. Congregations in this area of that denomination are far more tolerant than churches in the Midwest where the church is based.]

Jon

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