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How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By SofiaGambina Comments: 21, member since Sun Nov 24, 2013
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 03:15 PM

Let me just say, I'm muslim.
I wasn't muslim during 9/11 (I was in first grade and my family is Christian) and the boston bombings made me so sick. Having been attacked in public for a crime I did no commit, I would just like to know your honest opinion? The Quran says "if you kill an innocent man, you've killed all of humanity. If you save one you've saved all of humanity" These men and women involved are not muslims. They do not follow islam. Islam is the root word of salaam. (Peace.) and most of us practice that. What is your honest opinion of the muslim community? You won't offend me.

15 Replies to How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?

re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By slice Comments: 1247, member since Fri Oct 15, 2004
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 03:19 PM
That they're people like everyone else and not responsible for extremists who claim affiliation with their religion but don't act accordingly...?

Unfortunately, a good deal of people in this country don't feel the same way, so if I feel anything it's sympathy for the discrimination and stigma imposed upon the Muslim community.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By SofiaGambina Comments: 21, member since Sun Nov 24, 2013
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 03:21 PM
I love this site because everyone is wry accepting. Thank you. :)
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By LlamaLlamaDuckmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 7765, member since Sun Nov 21, 2004
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 03:34 PM
There are crazies in every religion they don't represent the religion as a whole.

The way I see it I might not agree with all religions but I should at least respect them.

One mosque in my city has had their windows broken several times. Last time a christian church replaced them.

Has my opinion changed since those 2 events.... I'm not too sure. I try to keep my opinions to myself about religion. I did a lot of research on the Muslim religion because I needed to figure things out for myself. im not necessarily anti any religion... But i can say im glad there are many.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By Louisemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 17315, member since Thu Jun 06, 2002
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 03:41 PM
Atrocities are perpetrated by individuals, not entire religions. I live in a city that, just about 40 years ago, was bombed by the IRA. Catholics. I'm Catholic by baptism. So I have a hard time with anyone that judges an entire religion by the acts of a select few nutters.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By schuhplattlerPremium member Comments: 3037, member since Sat Dec 23, 2006
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 05:34 PM
Sofia, your own religion had been sufficiently tolerant to civilize Eleventh Century Spain. We just need to be watchful so that the extreme radicals do not get the upper hand.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By MuffinHeadmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 5172, member since Thu Jun 10, 2004
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 06:49 PM
I'm in agreement with everyone above. I don't discriminate based on religion/gender/ethnicity/sexual orientation/etc.

But honestly, what do you expect posting this? Not a single person on DDN is going to say that they feel badly about Muslims.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By Chaconnemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 6359, member since Thu Jul 12, 2007
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 06:53 PM
As something of a scholarly expert on your religion because of the work I did during my career I think I somewhat understand what is going on. Just as there are fellow Christians whose actions I abhor, particularly those that mix their idea of politics with their idea of religion, so too are their people like that in almost every religion. Osama Bin Laden was one of those.

When you have people, some with legitimate grievances about conditions in their country you are going to find people who will modify that to a "God is on my side" argument. There are plenty of examples in History of that. Christian vs. Christian, Muslim vs. Muslim, Animist vs. Animist and all the permutations between these. There are people in the Middle East who still resent the 12 Century Crusades and Europeans still study Turkish inroads into Europe in the 17 Century and before in a negative light. (The Turks almost captured Vienna in the early 1600's.)

The Boston Bombers were not even from the geographic mainstream of Islamic influence. They were from an area of Russia that still harbor resentment for Russian conquests of remnants of the Turkish empire in the times of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great. What they hoped to prove by a bombing in Boston is beyond me as the USA has pretty much stayed out of the internal conflicts of what is now Southern Russia. We have viewed this as pretty much an internal Russian matter.

There is of course resentment in the Middle East to the creation of Israel and the Zionist immigration which preceded it. From a religious point of view that is really a side issue as there were almost as many Palestinian Christians displaced as there were Palestinian Muslims. Some countries in that area, notably Lebanon were actually majority Christian in the earlier 20th Century, and Syria had very significant Christian minorities, not to mention often mutually antagonistic Islamic sects...Sunni, Shi'a, Druze, Alawites,and nearly a dozen others. Unfortunately few Westerners know this history or understand the internal conflicts. All they know is that 19 guys who happened to be Islamic flew airplanes into our buildings. Most of those were from Yemen, on the fringes of the Middle East and the Arabian Peninsula who actually have more tribal grievances with Saudi Arabia than they do with anyone else. The more unknowing don't even understand (or seem to care) that the God of Islam is exactly the same figure as the God of both Judaism and Christianity. Muhammad, the Prophet of Islam said as much himself. [Allah, in Arabic, simply means THE God and opposed to a god. As a student of Arabic, I understand this, but few westerners do.]

As many Protestants (and I am one BTW) have historically been leery of Catholicism, though recognizing the religious commonalities, when you get any religion with tenets beyond Christian dogma, they both get even leerier. Most of us in the US grew up without any knowledge of the Islamic world. Most don't even understand that all Muslems are not Arab and that all Arabs are not Muslems. Few understand that Iran, for example, is not Arab, and their language, Farsi, though written with somewhat similar alphabets, has no relationship to Arabic. Before I was hired to work in the field I did, my knowledge of Middle East history basically stopped with the Pyramids (about 3000 years before there even was an Islam) and post Islamic history was a half page side bar in a high school text in a class few people took.

The downfall here is our own ignorance of the entire culture of the Middle East and it's religions; or, for that matter of any other religion or culture not our own.

Jon
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By schuhplattlerPremium member Comments: 3037, member since Sat Dec 23, 2006
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 07:46 PM
Chaconne wrote
The downfall here is our own ignorance of the entire culture of the Middle East and it's religions; or, for that matter of any other religion or culture not our own.


I would be more specific: The downfall here is our accepting another person's word on other religions and refusing to observe the source data for ourselves.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By majeremember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 5889, member since Sat Sep 29, 2007
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 11:21 PM
I feel no different than I did before 9/11. You have to be pretty ignorant to be against a whole faith for something a smaller group of them did.

I've read the Qur'an. There is some interesting stuff in there.

I am Catholic, btw.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By Kekoamember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 8949, member since Sat Jul 19, 2003
On Thu Nov 28, 2013 11:46 PM
My feelings are the same as they are for Christianity. I don't necessarily consider either religion to be peaceful (the holy books are far from it), but the interpretation and practice by the majority of adherents is non-violent and is one way to establish the human need for community.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings? (karma: 1)
By dancin_til_death Comments: 4381, member since Sat May 08, 2004
On Sat Nov 30, 2013 04:08 PM
If hatred from 9/11 was acceptable, I'd hate to think of what Afghans think of Christians in wake of over 900 civilians (villagers, normal innocent citizens) being killed by drone attacks since Obama took office.

The few problems I have had with people of an Islamic background I have always put down to cultural differences rather then Islam. That said I have also had problems with people of Hindu background because of their implicit belief that people are not equal.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By Dancing_EMTmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 3466, member since Wed Dec 08, 2004
On Sat Dec 14, 2013 02:06 PM
I've met a lot of crazy Christians. I've never met a crazy Muslim, all of the ones I've met are extremely nice. There are extremists in EVERY religion.

I used to live next door to a lovely Muslim couple who had a son. I never so much heard a PEEP from their son. He was always very polite. They were always inviting me over for meals, they were extremely nice people.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By Heartmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 15032, member since Thu Feb 14, 2002
On Fri Dec 27, 2013 08:16 PM
A crazy person can use anything as justification for their sadistic ramblings. You can use the Bible, you can use the Qur'an, you can use the Torah, you can use whatever you like. It is unfortunate but it is not the fault of the religion. Lord knows Christians have had enough militant whack jobs over the years.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings? (karma: 1)
By Gavrilushka Comments: 872, member since Wed Jul 11, 2012
On Sat Dec 28, 2013 06:18 AM
I'm not one for organised religion myself, I'd rather people adopt a faith and interpret it their own way rather than depend on a single key figure like a pope for guidance. But I digress. I have a few Muslim friends, which to a friend of mine who lives in the US is considered 'weird' as I'm gay. All I can say is that it's no weirder than had it been a Christian or a Jew or anyone of any faith. It depends on which teachings you hold to a higher status than others and thus why you get so many dominions of one religion archetype. And the muslims I meet...they are such lovely people - very polite, very kind and generous, very friendly. Although I do notice that some muslims may act unapproachable in public, but once you start talking to them they loosen up. Sadly, I think it's because of the stigma of being muslim and that makes me really sad. There was a girl in my class for linguistics and she wore the most beautiful hijabs and secured them with this really nice pearl and rhinestone pin. It took me a long time to muster up the courage to tell her that I really liked them, because I was always worried I might offend. But she was very sweet about it and took me hijab shopping! :)

Perhaps my upbringing is different, I was brought up to be curious about other cultures and other faiths. When I learnt about 9/11 or the Boston bombings the thought of 'What was their religion? They must be bad...' did not ever cross my mind. The media is essentially the most racist and prejudiced thing in the world - attempting to force people to spite those that are 'different'. But I grew up in Russia and despite what a lot of people think, since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has become fascinated by the world - they fell in love with cultures and countries and new religions. Sushi and spicy Thai food is becoming very popular there. While there were some racists, I was brought up in a new era that essentially told us the world is new and exciting and it would do us good to involve ourselves in new cultures. We visited mosques and Buddhist temples as school field trips - something I WISH they would do and encourage in western schools. To add to this, I now live in Australia (since 8) and the diversity, the ability to meet and interact with other people with different beliefs is a good thing. The media here doesn't pinpoint race and religion as harshly as the US does which makes me happy because a lot of people can shove aside their differences and be more closely united than divided.

The people responsible for the Boston bombings (Chechens) have been bombing parts of Moscow for a long time (a couple of years ago 100 people were injured in an airport bombing), but it goes beyond the religion of these people. There are land disputes, there are rights disputes and whenever there are such disputes people turn to the only powerful thing on their side - their religion - and use that as a power identity, as some sort of bizarre justification for their actions. Then you get extremists out of that.
re: How do you feel about muslims after 9/11 and the Boston Bombings?
By KaeDancer Comments: 33, member since Wed Jan 22, 2014
On Thu Jan 23, 2014 02:50 AM
Unfortunately, there are extremists in all walks of life, not just limited to faith based activities.

I consider these people to be highly dangerous and psychologically unstable people.

Islam is fundamentally about peace, acceptance, love for God and each other, just like other Abrahamic Faiths.

Sadly, some people choose to misunderstand the will of God and again, this is not restricted to any particular faith.

I believe that everyone has the right to practice their own faith peacefully, whatever that might be.

It is always about the individual, after all, God looks at the heart x

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