Forum: Ballet / Ballet - Beginners

How do you lose weight for ballet?
By dancergirl1001
On Sun Aug 02, 2015 01:20 PM

I really need to lose weight! Could someone write a list with these three things:
Workout
Diet
Stretches

Thanks! whoever answers is awesome!

6 Replies to How do you lose weight for ballet?

re: How do you lose weight for ballet?
By wembley
On Mon Aug 03, 2015 06:06 PM
I think that it would be a better idea to get advice from your doctor or a nutritionist. We don't know you at all, and most of us here are not health professionals.
re: How do you lose weight for ballet?
By Sumayah
On Mon Aug 03, 2015 09:45 PM
I'm going to start with diet.

Lean proteins, lots of vegetables, lots of water, medium ratio of fresh fruit, smallish amount of healthy fats, and very little processed or sugary foods.

Depending on you activity level, you might need to eat way more than you think you should. But it's what you're eating that's important. Eating 2000 calories of McDonalds and Starbucks and eating 2000 calories of nourishing food will get two different outcomes.

Stretching should happen after your body is fully warm. So walk and jog for 15 minutes, do some dynamic stretching amd then work on your static stretching (sitting in splits, etc). Plus if you spend 15 - 20 minutes warming up your muscles and getting your heart rate up, you've done your workout too.

It is not recommended to lose more than 2lbs a week. And it takes time. If you're serious about losing weight, I second talking to a nutritionist and getting on a healthy plan.
re: How do you lose weight for ballet?
By Ballerina_Bunny
On Tue Aug 04, 2015 01:28 PM
You lose weight for ballet the same way as you'd lose weight for any other activity: by eating healthy, exercising, taking care of your body, and NOT starving yourself.

Now, everybody's metabolism and the way they should go about losing weight is different... for instance, some people exercise to lose weight without much of a change in diet and this works fine for them, while others might change their diet significantly and not exercise much but still lose weight. Everybody's different, and it's in your best interests to discuss a weight loss plan with a health care professional that knows you.

I second Sumayah's points.
re: How do you lose weight for ballet?
By Gaudium
On Wed Aug 05, 2015 07:07 AM
I can only speak for myself, as I have no knowledge into your health and age. I lost weight by increasing my activity and eating the same amount. If you do not lose weight with increased activity and at the same time keeping your diet at the same level something may be out of wack and you should see a medical professional. But the minute I lowered my physical activities I would start to gain weight again, So I had to keep moving. I must admit I did cut down on my favorite foods and that would be sweets. LOL
re: How do you lose weight for ballet?
By Storm_Trouper
On Wed Aug 05, 2015 03:18 PM
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-08-05 15:22:28
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-08-05 15:24:47
It might not be such a great idea to provide weight losing information, even when it is just general, well established, high level, recognized principles, however well intentioned. Ideally, some degree of individual assessment is called for, while the person also needs to become much more educated about their personal health choices. Body soma type? (Body Mass Index isn't all what it's made out to be sometimes.)

For one thing, we don't know the OP's age (Check out the profile pic!) i.e. whether she's a growing, developing youngster whose needs, stage of growth and level of maturity would differ from those of an adult.

For another, we don't know the OP's real motivation behind the desire for the weight loss and whether it is in keeping within norms, nor the extent of the reduction sought and why. For example, limiting weight reduction to no more than 2 pounds a week wouldn't make sense to me if an individual was the subject of an eating disorder.

Ballet visuals in general seem to have a fixation with representations of exceptionally lean body mass, muscle tone, hyper flexibility and idealized body images. So perspective can be called for I think.

The National Ballet School (Toronto, Canada) has this resource...
www.theshoeroom.ca . . .
re: How do you lose weight for ballet? (karma: 1)
By Sumayah
On Wed Aug 05, 2015 08:57 PM
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2015-08-05 20:59:51
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2015-08-06 11:42:55 Images were distorting the page
Storm_Trouper wrote:

For one thing, we don't know the OP's age


Actually, fun fact, mods can see that info. And I did check before responding with "general, well established, high level, recognized principles." Actually it's *why* I responded the way I did. Because encouraging someone to eat healthy, nourishing, growing foods isn't a bad thing - no well-meaning about it. In fact, check out the 2015 food pyramids:
Image hotlink - 'https://athleteafterword.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/foodpyramid-large.png?w=625'
Here's another pyramid, another one, and
another one.

Light exercise leads into stretching, again, you wouldn't advise someone to stretch cold would you? And here's another pyramid for you...
Image hotlink - 'http://dennisyam.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/activity_pyramid.jpg'
Image hotlink - 'http://tx.english-ch.com/teacher/len/wpaiifychildact1.jpg'

No matter her age, the advice is sound.

For another, we don't know the OP's real motivation behind the desire for the weight loss and whether it is in keeping within norms, nor the extent of the reduction sought and why. For example, limiting weight reduction to no more than 2 pounds a week wouldn't make sense to me if an individual was the subject of an eating disorder.


If they do have an ED, then it's just as important to them to know what healthy eating and activity looks like and what is and isn't considered appropriate. A crash diet to lose 10 pounds in 2 weeks is super unhealthy no matter who you are, your motivations, or history. So if they are losing up to (but not over) that 2lb amount, a healthy person will be fine so long as they're keeping their nutrition in check. Someone with an unhealthy eating pattern probably won't listen regardless. That is also why I echoed the sentiment that it should be under the care of a nutritionist who can tailor to their needs.

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