Forum: Ballet / Ballet - Beginners

Ways of Teaching & Learning
By Storm_Trouper
On Tue Dec 01, 2015 08:29 PM
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-12-01 20:32:02

Trockadero Trainee posted about the challenges faced by late-starting adults to gain technical proficiency efficiently when they only have access to conventionally structured drop-in classes rather than syllabus-based classes (with examination options).

Attached is an image of a poster for a (opt in or drop in) training approach that is unconventional and probably uncommon / rare; and yet is effective and efficient. It's like classes that focus primarily on turning or on men's technique, which are not commonly available to adult recreational learners. Is it rare for ballet traditionalists to think outside the box and innovate?

6 Replies to Ways of Teaching & Learning

re: Ways of Teaching & Learning
By Storm_Trouper
On Tue Dec 01, 2015 11:36 PM
Ailey Extension in NYC I noticed offers Turns & Jumps for beginners classes.
re: Ways of Teaching & Learning
By hummingbird
On Wed Dec 02, 2015 01:45 PM
Most studio's have what they call leaps and turns or technique classes. They're normally for their Jazz or Contemporary students who don't want to take ballet and all of the studio's near me that offer them make you take another class with them in order to enrol. I used to teach one a few years ago at the old studio I worked at.
re: Ways of Teaching & Learning
By Storm_Trouper
On Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:36 PM
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-12-03 22:42:15
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-12-03 22:48:46
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-12-03 22:55:31
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-12-03 22:59:13
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-12-03 23:00:48
That's good to hear. It seems less common to set these techniques apart for ballet devotees (I suppose since turns and jumps are ordinarily incorporated into center.)

The Alvin Ailey Extension (public adult) program referred to above is being given by Finis Jung actually I just found out. Unfortunately, it's only offered one day per week, on the very same evening that I have to depart from NYC :(

The description says 30 minutes of warm up followed by technique, so there's a parallel with Richard's poster approach.

I have come across only one website reference to turn classes specifically so far in Canada, however it isn't actually being offered!

www.debbieleedance.com . . .

Nat'l Ballet School (Toronto Canada) names specific turns to be covered or studied / learned in their various levels of the NBS adult curriculum, which is sessional not drop-in.
re: Ways of Teaching & Learning
By SarahdncrPremium member
On Sat Dec 05, 2015 04:02 PM
This is really a neat and great idea!! I am happy with my teachers, but I wish they would do something like this were we spend an entire session or even a few sessions on just learning a few of the more complex steps.

You said it best, and I have said it on here before, us adults, (esp. us who did not dance as children/teens/young adults) have a much more difficult time learning because of the way we are wired. We tend to overthink everything, as it is not natural to us not having done it for umpteen years in our youth building up the muscle memory.

We need (some) hand holding, and visualization, very s...l...o...w... demonstration & break-down of sub movements in the more complex steps, and (a lot) of repetition till we can get it straight in our heads.

Again, I would love to see more teacher's adopt something like this if they can.
re: Ways of Teaching & Learning
By Storm_Trouper
On Sun Dec 06, 2015 05:08 AM
Edited by Storm_Trouper (249942) on 2015-12-06 05:14:52
It's not that adults are hardwired differently, so much as adults learn differently from children and teens, and our brains and bodies are more fully developed. Some adults are more prone to analyzing whereas there is a range of cognitive and emotional strengths and approaches that adults draw upon. Much is understood and accepted about conventional ballet education, i.e. the traditional norm of many starting out from a young age, with those best suited and able to adapt rising and remaining, amidst significant attrition. That model serves ballet well but isn't appropriate in other contexts. Little has been written and published about what the best practices and optimized teaching approaches would seem to be for adult, late-starting ballet enthusiasts. Language and music are examples of 'skills' that, like ballet, benefit from starting early in life. When adults take up a (new) language or music, they are not necessarily taught using the same methods that are considered to be best suited to children.
re: Ways of Teaching & Learning
By Storm_Trouper
On Sun Dec 06, 2015 05:25 AM
Storm_Trouper wrote:



The Alvin Ailey Extension (public adult) program referred to above is being given by Finis Jhung actually I just found out.


Corrected spelling of last name.

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