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Health & Nutrition
So, doc kind of undersold that one...
By Theresamember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 34891, member since Wed May 22, 2002
On Fri Oct 14, 2016 09:15 PM

Last year James (my 10 year old), had a rash of vasovagel episodes. He'd be fine, he'd get the shaky nausea (sometimes accompanied by passing or blacking out), he'd bounce back. Every time I dutifully took him to the doctor, and every time, I tried like crazy to get the doctors to listen to me when I said that I felt like his blood sugar was bottoming out. They'd check him, and absent being able to prove anything, they'd all just sort of shrug.

I just took him in, and asked to have his glucose checked again, cause he's had several episodes in the last few days where he sort of read like a "Who's Who" of symptoms of hypoglycemia. She dutifully checked his sugars, and a few days later, I get a phone call that everything's OK. I'm like "What, really?!"

This morning, they posted the results of the test. Our doctors office posts all the test results right online where the patients (or their parents, I suppose) can see them.

His glucose test that was OK? The blood was drawn about an hour after having eaten breakfast. Breakfast that was almost completely carbs. The acceptable scale was 50-135.

James' was 57. FIFTY SEVEN?! An hour after eating nothing but carbs, when his sugar should have been through the roof?

So, they really undersold that "His levels are all normal" thing, didn't they? Cause when you're skirting that close to the line, isn't it a little more like "He isn't bad off enough that we're going to medicate him."?

4 Replies to So, doc kind of undersold that one...

re: So, doc kind of undersold that one...
By Sumayah Comments: 6876, member since Wed Nov 12, 2008
On Sat Oct 15, 2016 09:29 AM
To my knowledge they don't medicate for blood sugar problems. At least they never did for me and I'm vasovagal hypoglycemic. It took me a while to get mine under control, I can offer tips and tricks if you want.

Considering most hypoglycemia problems are tied to pre-diabetes, you'd think they'd be less cavalier about it. Heads up though, mine isn't connected to diabetes, it's tied to my endocrine system. Since you've had thyroid issues, it might be prudent to get his adrenals and thyroid checked. Also, since hypoglycemia and huger can be mutually exclusive, his blood sugar could be bottoming out even after he's eaten or when he's not hungry. Usually a starlight mint or a soda or juice or even a slice of bread will stabilize me until I can eat some protein. I *always* have mints on me in case of emergency.
re: So, doc kind of undersold that one...
By Moonlitefairy06member has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 7177, member since Fri Apr 16, 2004
On Sat Oct 15, 2016 02:20 PM
I agree it's off that he's so low within an hour of eating and the doctor isn't concerned about it. Have you considered going to an endocrinologist to get a more specialized opinion? I wonder if they could do something like the test they do for pregnant women to see how fast his sugar drops. Though besides carrying sugar around with him, I'm not sure what else can be done.
re: So, doc kind of undersold that one...
By Sumayah Comments: 6876, member since Wed Nov 12, 2008
On Sat Oct 15, 2016 10:16 PM
Moonlitefairy06 wrote:

Though besides carrying sugar around with him, I'm not sure what else can be done.


Generally 3 smaller meals high in protein and low in sugars with 2 snacks containing a protein and sugar help keep an even keel. Cinnamon is good for blood sugar stability too. My mom had to tell my teachers at school that I needed a snack around either mid-morning or mid-afternoon depending on what time lunch was at. Eating protein right before bed helps too - like a handful of nuts or a hardboiled egg - it makes mornings easier. One of my favorite snacks was slices of cheddar cheese on slices of an apple.
re: So, doc kind of undersold that one...
By Moonlitefairy06member has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 7177, member since Fri Apr 16, 2004
On Sun Oct 16, 2016 09:48 AM
Sumayah wrote:

Moonlitefairy06 wrote:

Though besides carrying sugar around with him, I'm not sure what else can be done.


Generally 3 smaller meals high in protein and low in sugars with 2 snacks containing a protein and sugar help keep an even keel. Cinnamon is good for blood sugar stability too. My mom had to tell my teachers at school that I needed a snack around either mid-morning or mid-afternoon depending on what time lunch was at. Eating protein right before bed helps too - like a handful of nuts or a hardboiled egg - it makes mornings easier. One of my favorite snacks was slices of cheddar cheese on slices of an apple.


Yes thats good advice to prevent it from happening. I guess I was thinking more of what to do of when it happens. It's not like there an anti-insulin medication (that I know of anyway).

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