Forum: Highland / Highland

Scottish step dancing
By Katja144member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Sun Jan 20, 2019 10:24 AM

Has anyone ever done any Scottish step dancing? I find it interesting, in part because some of the dances in Highland hint at rhythmic foot movements (jig, hornpipe, Earl) but don't full incorporate them (and of course, hornpipe and Earl use soft shoes so you don't hear these movements unless you're loud and there's no music, though somewhere on Youtube there's a video of someone doing Earl in hard shoes and it's pretty cool).

13 Replies to Scottish step dancing

re: Scottish step dancing
By kinsidhe
On Mon Jan 21, 2019 06:38 AM
Hi,

I've done a bit here and there, as I have come across it. It doesn't seem to be very common, though I think there are a couple of groups in Scotland that are doing it. I was in the process of learning a version of "The Fife Hornpipe" lots of fun and you can see some of the influence of Highland in it, or vice versa! You'll see a lot of the flavour of Highland hardshoe/Scottish Step dancing in Cape Breton dancing as it was brought over from Scotland and they've kept a lot of the tradition of that style of dance.

I love the Earl done in hard shoe and as far as I can tell, it was originally a hard shoe dance and became a soft shoe dance under the newer boards in Highland dance. The video of the hard shoe Earl is from New Zealand, where they seem to have kept more of the older steps and styles of Highland and Step dance from longer ago. Fun stuff! (I've linked it below.)

I am very keen on 'collecting' as many of the older dances and step dances along with keeping the current Highland dances. I just like the variety and would hate to see them fade into obscurity because they aren't done as much anymore. Really glad to know there are other Highland dancers out there who are interested as well!

www.youtube.com . . .
re: Scottish step dancing
By Katja144member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Tue Jan 22, 2019 01:41 PM
Yes, I'm with you there. I've seen videos allegedly of old steps, and once for a show my dance school did an "old steps" Fling, which was fun (though it probably had little meaning to much of the audience, except parents of dancers who are well-versed in the current textbook steps). If these "old steps" are authentic, it would be great if they could be put into a book. I'd have the urge to do it myself, except I haven't a clue how to authenticate them and I'd hate to put something out that isn't true or be criticized for doing same. (I keep hearing somewhere about a brochure that had old steps in it, but it was elusive to find, and it seems I even once saw a copy of it or part of it online, and those steps were different from the ones in the videos I'd seen and the ones my teacher taught us for the show.) It would be nice to preserve the steps and make them easily accessible to everyone. Even if they're never danced in competition, they would be neat to pull out for shows and performances (or, competitions could always do an "old steps Fling" as a special extra dance).

I read somewhere-- probably here-- that the "new" steps in the most recent SOBHD textbook are from old steps? (Which, frankly, is the only thing that endears them to me because I'm not that fond of them otherwise, lol, but that would be a discussion for another thread and possibly considered "bad form" to say anyway.) So I think that's interesting and kind of cool, and if it's the case, I'm glad they got some old steps back into circulation (even if they're not the ones I would've picked).

The Earl video you posted is exactly the one I'm thinking of. Any idea about the shoes she's wearing? I assume the same type as the NZ dancers use for the jig, but I don't know what those are like, either-- not sure if they're the same type of jig shoes Irish dancers use? They're definitely louder than "our" jig shoes (which on one hand is cool, but on the other, if we had shoes that loud surely everyone at a competition would go deaf and no one would be able to hear the piper!). I'm intrigued by the NZ dances (and I love their jig outfit!) but don't know much about them (on another Scottish-but-non-dance board, someone Scottish mentioned something like "New Zealand isn't under the SOBHD tyranny" or something like that-- I've found people in Scotland seem to have quite strong feelings about competitive Highland dance in general and the SOBHD in particular, but then again, a lot of Irish-music musicians-- not sure about Irish people-- also have strong feelings about competitive Irish dance. I assume whenever you take a folk dance and turn it into a strongly-regimented competitive form with it's own "look" and culture, traditionalists are not going to be happy, with partial reason, but that's probably another thread in itself as well). At the same show, our school also did a hornpipe with NZ steps, which was also really cool.

This is the old-steps Fling, which I know I found here in the first place, so you've probably seen it already, too: www.youtube.com . . .

But yes, the Scottish and Breton step dancing would be interesting to learn, at least a little bit. I've thought of doing a choreography in jig shoes with inspiration from both Scottish step dancing and Irish dance, with more of the rhythmic footwork. (I bet it would be really awesome with group choreography.)

(Ha, if I were a teacher, I'd consider making students practice Earl and hornpipe in hard shoes, just to make it really obvious if their rhythm isn't right... in soft shoes it's too easy to get away with not-quite-right rhythm...)
re: Scottish step dancing
By double4some
On Thu Jan 24, 2019 03:47 AM
You will find lots of useful information about the history of highland dancing and Scottish step dancing on this Colin Robertson's website
colinrobertson.net . . .
re: Scottish step dancing
By double4some
On Thu Jan 24, 2019 04:58 AM
Regarding old steps two other documents used to be available, but I'm not sure if they still are:
Fling for Logan, Forty step fling script www.fortystepfling.com
SOBHD Old Steps Folder from SOBHD website
re: Scottish step dancing
By kinsidhe
On Thu Jan 24, 2019 10:11 AM
Double4some: Thanks! those are some great links. Lead to some interesting finds.

Katja144:

From what I understand, the 'new' steps in the SOBHD book are drawn from older steps that were once danced. From where they were pulled, I am not certain. Some are definitely from before my teacher was dancing and as she says she 'danced when the dinosaurs roamed'. So, if they were pulled from old books, or from memory, or some other form of records I am not sure. The new book intro simply says "there are steps and movements from the past being reintroduced..." Why the ones that made it into the book were chosen is also a mystery, I suppose it was a matter of the board's preference.

Prior to the SOBDH standardisation steps were recorded within schools, or by teachers so variations were bound to occur throughout various regions. Even the 'old' steps that have even collected are largely collected based on the memory of someone who once danced it and learned it through the passing down through generations. I personally quite like a lot of them, others I am not so keen on.

I've been on the lookout for the elusive brochure as well! SOHDA used to have a link to where you could get it, but I dont see that anymore. I like the SOHDA for the very fact that they have managed to hold onto more of the other dances.

I'll never be an accomplished ( in the competitive world) highland dancer, so having a variety of dances to learn, give me another avenue to pursue my sheer love of this dance form.

As for the shoes the Earl dancer is wearing...I am guessing they are the same type of hard shoe the New Zealand dancers wear for their Jigs/Hornpipes (so cool they have hornpipe hard shoe dances as well as a variety of jigs)

mcphees.co.nz . . .

Oh yes, there is a lot of strong feelings about the SOBHD both for and against. It's a shame really, because the way I see it, each board/school has it's place in the history and evolution of this form of dance. I think a lot of the outcry against the SOBHD is from its very rigid structure as far as what is allowed/not allowed and who is permitted to dance/not permitted. It can come across as very exclusive. It begins to delve into the politics of the competitive world and that's a whole other kettle of fish. It's something I am only dimly aware of, and only understand in the most elementary way. I am not sure I am unhappy about that status of knowledge or not. :)

There is also a strong voice against competitive highland dancing or modern highland dancing from those who feel it is diluting or changing a traditional dance form into something else. It can not be denied that the shape of what is now "Highland Dance" is different from even 60 years ago. The dances are slower, power and perfect precision dominate where perhaps quickness and fluidity were once more prominent. It does 'look' different. The costumes are also different, having been standardised and developed more recently-especially with the introduction of the 'female' attire. There are those for whom, these changes represent an unwanted usurping and alteration to what they consider their 'tradition'. I am more of the mind that traditions naturally evolve through generations, taking on new aspects and letting go of others. I can see the value of both the keeping true to the past and allowing for growth in the future. But, then, I just want to dance!

Love, love, love the NZ hornpipe steps! The sword fighting one used to be in the books here, but it is no longer, mores the pity. But who knows maybe in the spirit of the updating the Highland Book with older steps being brought back, they may do the same with the hornpipe one day. I will keep my fingers crossed! My dream would be to be able to go to NZ and learn their dances!

The link you put for the Auld steps is great, so clearly danced. It would be fun to do these. Here's another with a lovely dancer showing some more old steps.

www.youtube.com . . .

You and I are of the same mind about a hard(jig)shoe choreo! it would be so fun to do, and not something one generally sees!

And, I had the same thought about having students dance the errol and hornpipe in the hard shoes. It is how I practice them, so I can hear the rhythms and dont cheat them. I dont have any students right now, but I am working on my Members ( have my associates). Maybe one day.
re: Scottish step dancing
By Claramel
On Thu Jan 24, 2019 03:15 PM
I've been enjoying reading everyone's thoughts, I'm interested in all the old steps too. Can confirm that the new steps in textbook were once in competition. My teacher remembers doing the alternate crossover steps (although not the combination of shake and low cut) and she was dancing in the 50's and 60's.

The hard shoes the NZ dancers use are extremely similar to Irish hard shoes. They appear to have a longer tongue at the top and less thick on the 'hard' part of the shoe under the front toes....a slightly more original shoe to the modern Irish dance shoe. My Irish dance shoes have quite a bulbous heal too.

I think I remember reading somewhere (or someone saying) that most of the versions of steps the sobhd chose for their textbook are from lowland teachers and dancers as opposed to those further north. Maybe some of those variations we see in NZ and old textbooks/pamphlets are from the highlands?

I dance with CRN when I'm Irish dancing which is an organization that split off from the main organization Commisun (no idea of spelling sorry!). There's been quite a few groups to break away because they felt that Irish dancing was starting to deviate too much from its traditional roots. Interesting in that when this happened (the 80's) they predicted that competitive Irish dance would change so much in the next 30 years, which it has!

I'd really like to see some kind of archive that has descriptions of old steps, videos, music, photos, the provenance of all the things that didn't make it into current textbooks both for highland and Irish.
re: Scottish step dancing
By kinsidhe
On Fri Jan 25, 2019 02:00 PM
Hi Claramel,

Glad of your input!
I wonder if there are any NZ dancers lurking? Would love to get what ever info they may have on the origins of their steps/dances. Maybe you are correct and they came from dances from the West coast or Highlands of Scotland. Or maybe from a mix of whatever Irish and Scottish step dances people who settled there brought with them.

It's great to get the confirmation your teacher remembers dancing some of these 'new' old steps reintroduced. Sounds like your teacher was dancing right at the beginnings of the SOBHD.

My cousin is/was an Irish dancer and I am learning a little of it, though my passion is firmly in the Highland world. I dont really know -anything- about the different forms or organisations, but it sounds as if CRN? the one you dance with isn't following in the newer form that has arisen that I see? It would be fascinating to see how much cross over there is between the more traditional style and the Scottish step dancing and the NZ dances. Interestingly, I have seen elements reminiscent of older Irish Step dancing in some of the clogging styles of Northern England- I have friend there who is a clogger and is also keen on learning/preserving the Scottish Hardshoe dances/steps.

I completely agree with you on an archive! I am not technically savvy, but I am thinking it may fall to people like us to get that ball rolling somehow. I am laughing to myself though, because I was looking at the PDF of a pamphlet for an old hardshoe dance and could not understand one Iota of the notation used to describe the steps! It was like some wild code! I thought, "no wonder things get altered or changed, sometimes it is just a matter of not fully comprehending someone else's notes!
re: Scottish step dancing
By kinsidhe
On Fri Jan 25, 2019 02:06 PM
Here's another oldie but goodie-1935 Seann Truibhas!

It was clearly edited for the film and so some of the steps are out of order than were perhaps actually danced. But is it a lovely rendition of the Entrechat with Shedding Step that was added back into the book and you can see how the second step was done. The arms are so different!!! and this film is a really good example of what I mean by "the look" of the dance being different today than it was pre-SOBHD.

Enjoy!
www.youtube.com . . .
re: Scottish step dancing
By Claramel
On Fri Jan 25, 2019 03:52 PM
Edited by Claramel (275472) on 2019-01-25 15:53:04
Kinsidhe, yep she was the first International dancer to win the worlds in 1961. She says that back then the music was faster and so dancers didn't have to 'power' off the floor like they do now.

I had a read through that website you posted about the origins of Highland Dance and it was fascinating. Interesting how he says that you see a lot of athletes now and not artists. I would agree....with slower music and more powerful sharp movements we seem to have lost the flow that dancers in old videos have.

I think Irish dancing has developed the same. Take for example the Blackbird dance which is a traditional set dance. I image it would have originally looked much like this - www.youtube.com . . .
How CRN dancers dance it now looks much more like this - www.youtube.com . . .
And in coimisiun which is the biggest and most drastically changed organisation it looks more like this - www.youtube.com . . .
Note how we start with feet next to each other with slight turn out and never lifting the leg higher than the ankle. Then we start seeing more cross-over of legs with higher lifts (more CRN style) and finally what Julia is doing (world champion in coimisiun might I add) extreme cross-over and turn out with very high lifts of foot and leg up to hip height.
re: Scottish step dancing
By Katja144member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Jan 25, 2019 08:43 PM
Edited by Katja144 (137399) on 2019-01-25 21:09:26
double4some wrote:

You will find lots of useful information about the history of highland dancing and Scottish step dancing on this Colin Robertson's website
colinrobertson.net . . .


I know I've seen some of those videos on Youtube before. I like this one of the NZ fling! www.youtube.com . . .


double4some wrote:

Regarding old steps two other documents used to be available, but I'm not sure if they still are:
Fling for Logan, Forty step fling script www.fortystepfling.com
SOBHD Old Steps Folder from SOBHD website


I don't see the 40-step Fling script on the site in full anymore, but of course it's still on Youtube (and there seem to be steps here and there scattered over the associated blog). One would need to use the slow-down feature for the videos (and I wish he'd worn white hose to make his feet easier to see), but that's okay.


kinsidhe wrote:


I've been on the lookout for the elusive brochure as well! SOHDA used to have a link to where you could get it, but I dont see that anymore. I like the SOHDA for the very fact that they have managed to hold onto more of the other dances.


Ah, yes, that was where I once saw it!

kinsidhe wrote:


I'll never be an accomplished ( in the competitive world) highland dancer, so having a variety of dances to learn, give me another avenue to pursue my sheer love of this dance form.


Yes, me as well, though I'm more motivated by enjoying both the unconventional and, to an extent, tradition. Although I suppose there could be a slight thread of "if I can't be good, at least I can be interesting" thrown in there, lol. I don't like being one-sided, and I like exploring new things about things I'm interested in (and I'm not that fond of only knowing the things other people think I should know). (I've also been known to invent new steps for existing dances-- which I need to remember to pull out more in performances-- and entire new dances.)


kinsidhe wrote:


As for the shoes the Earl dancer is wearing...I am guessing they are the same type of hard shoe the New Zealand dancers wear for their Jigs/Hornpipes (so cool they have hornpipe hard shoe dances as well as a variety of jigs)

mcphees.co.nz . . .


Interesting. I can't tell if they're like our jig shoes with a tab over the top, or something different. Whatever it is, there's something louder about them. (I love their jig outfits, period. I like ours, too. I want both, lol.)

Maybe I need to watch more videos and try to learn a NZ jig. If nothing else, it would be nice to have something to pull out for the inevitable St. Patrick's Day performances besides our "Irish" jig-- it's fun, but a bit hard for people to understand the "angry washerwoman/husband" thing and why a dancer is up there stomping around and shaking their fists, even if it's explained that it's a caricature of an Irish person (and of course, some will find offense in that, as well).


kinsidhe wrote:


Oh yes, there is a lot of strong feelings about the SOBHD both for and against. It's a shame really, because the way I see it, each board/school has it's place in the history and evolution of this form of dance. I think a lot of the outcry against the SOBHD is from its very rigid structure as far as what is allowed/not allowed and who is permitted to dance/not permitted. It can come across as very exclusive. It begins to delve into the politics of the competitive world and that's a whole other kettle of fish. It's something I am only dimly aware of, and only understand in the most elementary way. I am not sure I am unhappy about that status of knowledge or not. :)

There is also a strong voice against competitive highland dancing or modern highland dancing from those who feel it is diluting or changing a traditional dance form into something else. It can not be denied that the shape of what is now "Highland Dance" is different from even 60 years ago. The dances are slower, power and perfect precision dominate where perhaps quickness and fluidity were once more prominent. It does 'look' different. The costumes are also different, having been standardised and developed more recently-especially with the introduction of the 'female' attire. There are those for whom, these changes represent an unwanted usurping and alteration to what they consider their 'tradition'. I am more of the mind that traditions naturally evolve through generations, taking on new aspects and letting go of others. I can see the value of both the keeping true to the past and allowing for growth in the future. But, then, I just want to dance!


I understand the people who are against it; they feel it's been turned more into a "show" or simply something very stiffly regulated, and like then they're being told that the way it's always been done is "wrong." I can see it from both sides, though, and to me it's more like there are two different worlds that come from similar roots; one side is traditional, more permissive, and hence more accessible to everyone. The other is the competitive version of that with its own culture and rules. I don't see why they have to bump heads, or even why a person can't cross over between the two, the same way I can play Bach or Vivaldi on my violin and ten minutes later be playing a reel or jig (or AC/DC if I want to), or the way some people here are both Highland and Irish dancers, or whatnot. Or to make another analogy, perhaps they each shouldn't be judged against the other, as having to be the same thing-- much like I might enjoy a cover or remix of a song more if I am not judging it against the original ("as a cover of X song, I don't like it. On its own, if I think of it as its own piece of music, I do." For that matter, I like the current design of Corvette only IF I don't think of it as a Corvette {you can't get rid of those iconic round tail lights!}). So let's not think of competitive Highland dance as a "cover" of traditional, and vice versa... maybe they've evolved into two different things (more stupid analogy: maybe we shouldn't criticize the white moths for not being dark and vice versa when they're simply different).

(What I don't like, though, are the people railing against females in Highland dance at all. Yes, I realize most Highland dancers are female these days, but I don't blame that on the women {as they often do}, I blame it on Western culture that has decided all forms of dance are "sissy," despite the fact that male ballet dancers are probably much stronger-- visibly so, let's say-- than those who denigrate them, and these same detractors probably couldn't do split highcuts to save their lives, let alone a long Sword {with or without kicking their swords all the way to Glasgow}. Competitive Highland dance certainly hasn't gotten *easier* since the days when women became a majority, so that can't be it {I once saw a complaint on Youtube that it has been "feminized." How, by making it harder?}. And, most Highland dancers are also kids but you don't see children as a group being blamed for the "decline" of Highland dance...)

I think it's a good thing to be able to understand, or at least be aware of. The question is where to take it. Does the offense over competitive dance (let's say Irish *or* Scottish) by people in the country of origin mean that those not of that heritage (and possibly not in the know about the controversy) shouldn't do it (I've been accused of cultural appropriation before, and yes, I'm well aware that I'd be more likely to receive that accusation were I doing Indian or African or Chinese dance and perhaps it's just the Caucasian aspect that allows me to "pass" as possibly-Scottish and thus avoid criticism?)? Or is it more offensive for those of that heritage, who perhaps could be considered to be one who "should know better," to perpetrate the offense? Does it matter?

(And, I'm not sure what those against the competitive aspect want because I'm not sure I've ever seen anyone say-- for competitive dance to be eliminated entirely? For women to be banned from it? For the rules to be relaxed*?

*Near impossible, of course-- because the fact that it's competitive means it's just going to become more difficult and more regulated. Otherwise, how do you judge between people if there aren't standards? And it's simply human nature that anything that's competitive-- from art to sports to the job market-- will keep getting progressively more difficult as people keep attempting to get a leg up on everyone else.)


kinsidhe wrote:

Here's another with a lovely dancer showing some more old steps. www.youtube.com . . .


Oh, yes, I recognize some of these from our school show! Cool.
re: Scottish step dancing
By Katja144member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Jan 25, 2019 09:07 PM
Edited by Katja144 (137399) on 2019-01-25 21:10:34
kinsidhe wrote:

Here's another oldie but goodie-1935 Seann Truibhas!

It was clearly edited for the film and so some of the steps are out of order than were perhaps actually danced. But is it a lovely rendition of the Entrechat with Shedding Step that was added back into the book and you can see how the second step was done. The arms are so different!!! and this film is a really good example of what I mean by "the look" of the dance being different today than it was pre-SOBHD.

Enjoy!
www.youtube.com . . .


I wish I had her entrechats!!!


Claramel wrote:

I've been enjoying reading everyone's thoughts, I'm interested in all the old steps too. Can confirm that the new steps in textbook were once in competition. My teacher remembers doing the alternate crossover steps (although not the combination of shake and low cut) and she was dancing in the 50's and 60's.

The hard shoes the NZ dancers use are extremely similar to Irish hard shoes. They appear to have a longer tongue at the top and less thick on the 'hard' part of the shoe under the front toes....a slightly more original shoe to the modern Irish dance shoe. My Irish dance shoes have quite a bulbous heal too.

I think I remember reading somewhere (or someone saying) that most of the versions of steps the sobhd chose for their textbook are from lowland teachers and dancers as opposed to those further north. Maybe some of those variations we see in NZ and old textbooks/pamphlets are from the highlands?

I dance with CRN when I'm Irish dancing which is an organization that split off from the main organization Commisun (no idea of spelling sorry!). There's been quite a few groups to break away because they felt that Irish dancing was starting to deviate too much from its traditional roots. Interesting in that when this happened (the 80's) they predicted that competitive Irish dance would change so much in the next 30 years, which it has!

I'd really like to see some kind of archive that has descriptions of old steps, videos, music, photos, the provenance of all the things that didn't make it into current textbooks both for highland and Irish.


This is interesting. I know there are different governing bodies for Irish dance and read a bit about it recently and it seems so confusing! Part of me likes the monopoly of the SOBHD for that reason, but I also understand the idea of, well, breaking a monopoly!

It'd be interesting to learn some Irish dance as well (and I know we used to have more "Highrish" dancers on the boards here than we do now, I think). I'm trying to put together a basic beginner reel for a St. Patrick's Day concert and it's an interesting experience to see the differences!

I had read an article not long ago detailing the differences between the various governing bodies for Irish dance (of course I'd never find it again or I'd link it), but I also imagine it's harder to dance with one of the smaller organizations since their competitions aren't as common (which is perhaps part of the reason so many of them are "open platform"?).


kinsidhe wrote:

Hi Claramel,

Glad of your input!
I wonder if there are any NZ dancers lurking? Would love to get what ever info they may have on the origins of their steps/dances. Maybe you are correct and they came from dances from the West coast or Highlands of Scotland. Or maybe from a mix of whatever Irish and Scottish step dances people who settled there brought with them.

It's great to get the confirmation your teacher remembers dancing some of these 'new' old steps reintroduced. Sounds like your teacher was dancing right at the beginnings of the SOBHD.

My cousin is/was an Irish dancer and I am learning a little of it, though my passion is firmly in the Highland world. I dont really know -anything- about the different forms or organisations, but it sounds as if CRN? the one you dance with isn't following in the newer form that has arisen that I see? It would be fascinating to see how much cross over there is between the more traditional style and the Scottish step dancing and the NZ dances. Interestingly, I have seen elements reminiscent of older Irish Step dancing in some of the clogging styles of Northern England- I have friend there who is a clogger and is also keen on learning/preserving the Scottish Hardshoe dances/steps.

I completely agree with you on an archive! I am not technically savvy, but I am thinking it may fall to people like us to get that ball rolling somehow. I am laughing to myself though, because I was looking at the PDF of a pamphlet for an old hardshoe dance and could not understand one Iota of the notation used to describe the steps! It was like some wild code! I thought, "no wonder things get altered or changed, sometimes it is just a matter of not fully comprehending someone else's notes!


That's one thing I like about the SOBHD textbook-- I feel it's very clear on describing the steps and movements, which is really helpful (when I first started learning, it was from a pipe band with associated dance group that would teach people for free; some of the other dancers were competitive dancers so the instruction was correct but not as nuanced as with a "regular" teacher and training for competition. The textbook came in very handy for me to understand small things I simply wasn't taught with this group). I would have the inclination to transcribe the old/alternate steps in this style-- both for sake of clarity, and because it's what dancers are used to and maybe that might make it more accessible/desirable than trying to figure it out from old cryptic notes that assume everyone already knows what's going on.

(It's also another thing I like about Highland vs. what I can gather of Irish-- that the same movement in ID can often by called by two or three different names, so if someone from another school or region is trying to describe a step to you, you'd be like "do a what now??" and the standardization from SOBHD makes it so much easier.)

The question is, even if such a thing was put together, would anyone pay attention? It's certainly something a person could self-publish and try to get the dance suppliers to pick it up for sale, but it still goes back to my worry about, how do we know for sure what is authentic? Is it as simple as being able to go back to "someone remembers doing this step in the 60s"? What about steps that are out there but there is no one who can verify them? And will anyone feel someone has a copyright of sorts on a step that could make publication a problem? Would SOBHD (or teachers) be unhappy that someone put these out there, even if it's not being suggested that they should supplant current accepted competition steps?
re: Scottish step dancing
By LingScot
On Mon Mar 11, 2019 12:26 AM
I have to admit to not having read through this whole thread, so apologies if this was in fact already posted above. But, at least some of the old steps were indeed published by the SOBHD in a separate folder, which you can buy through e.g. TartanTown: www.tartantown.com . . .

There is also a notebook of "Traditional Scripted Dances":
www.sobhd.net . . .
re: Scottish step dancing
By kinsidhe
On Thu Mar 14, 2019 10:14 AM
Thanks LingScot!

I ordered both. Unfortunately the Old Steps Folder is out of stock, not sure if they are going to make more....here's hoping??

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