Forum: Arts / Politics & Current Affairs

Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By maureensiobhan
On Sat Dec 14, 2019 10:08 AM

Let's face it. Trump has made some stupid decisions during his time in office. He hasn't, however, done anything illegal. I'm so sick of hearing on the news about the impeachment inquiry. Consider, too, the convenient timing. All of this bruhaha has started just when the 2020 campaign is about to start.
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By ChristinePremium member
On Thu Dec 19, 2019 09:06 PM
I am assuming you have not read the Mueller report, his edited transcript of his Ukranian call, or his illegal order for his staff to ignore the subpoenas of Congress?

Based ONLY on the two articles of impeachment that were drafted as a compromise to appease those facing re-election in Trump friendly districts, yes, in fact, he has done several things illegal.

That aside.... and having nothing to do with this particular issue at hand, rape is not a "stupid decision"...it is a crime. Fraud is not a momentary bad choice, it is a pattern...bogus "University", bogus "charity", pay offs to hid crimes, how many associates already convicted of crimes they committed for HIM? Money laundering? Decades of shady deals? This is all well documented...

You know I love you... honestly...but the time to stop drinking the Kool-Aid is now.

Even the Evangelicals...who supported him to the tune of 80% of their voters.... have gotten aboard the life boat on the Trump sinking ship.
www.christianitytoday.com . . .

It's ok to have been fooled by a con artist...we all have at some point in our lives..that's why they call them Con ARTISTS...not amateurs ... but there is no reason to keep this up once the truth is clear.

Mark Twain said it is easier to fool a man than to convince him he's been fooled. Let's be smarter now that the truth is upon us all, shall we?
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By tutufun
On Sun Jan 12, 2020 04:10 PM
I'm not certain whether or not he will be impeached...but I'm certain that he will be re-elected.
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By ChristinePremium member
On Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:42 AM
In response to the assertion that he has done nothing illegal...

www.npr.org . . .
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By ChristinePremium member
On Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:45 AM
tutufun wrote:

I'm not certain whether or not he will be impeached...but I'm certain that he will be re-elected.


Sadly, I fear this may be correct...I am stunned at the number of otherwise smart and decent people who refuse to examine real facts...it is so sad.

As to Impeachment....as of December 18th...yes...he has been Impeached. Forever and ever, this will be a fact.

Keep On Dancing*
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By maureensiobhan
On Thu Jan 16, 2020 07:46 PM
The impeachment will go to trial in the senate now. Trump is going to be allowed to call out Adam Shiff and Hillary Clinton, among others.
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By ChristinePremium member
On Tue Jan 21, 2020 11:24 AM
The trial is looking like a sham already.

I weep for our democracy.

Trump could easily eliminate the first charge...Obstruction of Congress....simply by allowing the documents and witnesses he's blocked to be released.

Assuming he is innocent...these documents and witnesses would also eliminate the second article...Abuse of Power...

Sadly....they are not even going to attempt to defend this as he has already admitted much wrong doing and dozens of people have testified under oath to this.

It is disgusting to watch this commitment to ignorance.
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By ChristinePremium member
On Tue Jan 21, 2020 11:25 AM
maureensiobhan wrote:

The impeachment will go to trial in the senate now. Trump is going to be allowed to call out Adam Shiff and Hillary Clinton, among others.



Sorry... this is absolutely NOT TRUE....please cite your source?
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By ChristinePremium member
On Mon Feb 03, 2020 01:50 PM
No witnesses, no documents, as per the majority party. Eight resolutions were put up for a vote before the trial started, all 53 GOP Senators voted NO.... after a remarkable presentation by the House managers, the defense team for the President presented a rather peculiar defense of, "Yeah, he did it....so what?" It was horrible. There were also a number of verifiable falsehoods presented by these "defenders" and once again, the vote to deny fact witnesses and hard, cold, evidence, was denied. The only two members of the GOP caucus to vote to allow witnesses and documents were Mitt Romney ...whose state HATES Trump, his vulgarity, his abuse, and his corruption, and Susan Collins, who was given a "hall pass" by Mitch McConnell as it is likely she will lose her race in November if she sides with the GOP.

If all of this isn't depressing enough...globally speaking...Brexit is official despite our hope that reason would prevail and the climate change denier of a PM in Australia is still in denial, while the fires heat up again.

Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how was the play?

Don't dance for any of this today....
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By maureensiobhan
On Wed Feb 05, 2020 07:53 PM
Why am I not surprised that Trump was aquitted? I must say, the Democrats made absolute fools of themselves by pulling this impeachment. Anybody with any sense could see how this would play out.
re: Will Donald Trump Be Impeached?
By ChristinePremium member
On Mon Feb 10, 2020 11:33 PM
*sigh*

Feb. 5, 2020

Opinion By Sherrod Brown

In Private, Republicans Admit They Acquitted Trump Out of Fear
One journalist remarked to me, “How in the world can these senators walk around here upright when they have no backbone?”

...

Not guilty. Not guilty.

In the United States Senate, like in many spheres of life, fear does the business.

Think back to the fall of 2002, just a few weeks before that year’s crucial midterm elections, when the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq was up for a vote. A year after the 9/11 attacks, hundreds of members of the House and the Senate were about to face the voters of a country still traumatized by terrorism.

Senator Patty Murray, a thoughtful Democrat from Washington State, still remembers “the fear that dominated the Senate leading up to the Iraq war.”

“You could feel it then,” she told me, “and you can feel that fear now” — chiefly among Senate Republicans.

For those of us who, from the start, questioned the wisdom of the Iraq war, our sense of isolation surely wasn’t much different from the loneliness felt in the 1950s by Senator Herbert Lehman of New York, who confronted Joe McCarthy’s demagogy only to be abandoned by so many of his colleagues. Nor was it so different from what Senator George McGovern must have felt when he announced his early opposition to the Vietnam War and was then labeled a traitor by many inside and outside of Congress.

History has indeed taught us that when it comes to the instincts that drive us, fear has no rival. As the lead House impeachment manager, Representative Adam Schiff, has noted, Robert Kennedy spoke of how “moral courage is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle.”

Playing on that fear, the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, sought a quick impeachment trial for President Trump with as little attention to it as possible. Reporters, who usually roam the Capitol freely, have been cordoned off like cattle in select areas. Mr. McConnell ordered limited camera views in the Senate chamber so only presenters — not absent senators — could be spotted.

And barely a peep from Republican lawmakers.

One journalist remarked to me, “How in the world can these senators walk around here upright when they have no backbone?”

Fear has a way of bending us.

Late in the evening on day four of the trial I saw it, just 10 feet across the aisle from my seat at Desk 88, when Mr. Schiff told the Senate: “CBS News reported last night that a Trump confidant said that Republican senators were warned, ‘Vote against the president and your head will be on a pike.’” The response from Republicans was immediate and furious. Several groaned and protested and muttered, “Not true.” But pike or no pike, Mr. Schiff had clearly struck a nerve. (In the words of Lizzo: truth hurts.)

Of course, the Republican senators who have covered for Mr. Trump love what he delivers for them. But Vice President Mike Pence would give them the same judges, the same tax cuts, the same attacks on workers’ rights and the environment. So that’s not really the reason for their united chorus of “not guilty.”

DEBATABLE
Agree to disagree, or disagree better?
For the stay-in-office-at-all-cost representatives and senators, fear is the motivator. They are afraid that Mr. Trump might give them a nickname like “Low Energy Jeb” and “Lyin’ Ted,” or that he might tweet about their disloyalty. Or — worst of all — that he might come to their state to campaign against them in the Republican primary. They worry:

“Will the hosts on Fox attack me?”

“Will the mouthpieces on talk radio go after me?”

“Will the Twitter trolls turn their followers against me?”

My colleagues know they all just might. There’s an old Russian proverb: The tallest blade of grass is the first cut by the scythe. In private, many of my colleagues agree that the president is reckless and unfit. They admit his lies. And they acknowledge what he did was wrong. They know this president has done things Richard Nixon never did. And they know that more damning evidence is likely to come out.

So watching the mental contortions they perform to justify their votes is painful to behold: They claim that calling witnesses would have meant a never-ending trial. They tell us they’ve made up their minds, so why would we need new evidence? They say to convict this president now would lead to the impeachment of every future president — as if every president will try to sell our national security to the highest bidder.

I have asked some of them, “If the Senate votes to acquit, what will you do to keep this president from getting worse?” Their responses have been shrugs and sheepish looks.

They stop short of explicitly saying that they are afraid. We all want to think that we always stand up for right and fight against wrong. But history does not look kindly on politicians who cannot fathom a fate worse than losing an upcoming election. They might claim fealty to their cause — those tax cuts — but often it’s a simple attachment to power that keeps them captured.

As Senator Murray said on the Senate floor in 2002, “We can act out of fear” or “we can stick to our principles.” Unfortunately, in this Senate, fear has had its way. In November, the American people will have theirs.
>>>
Sherrod Brown (@SenSherrodBrown), is the senior United States senator from Ohio and is the author of “Desk 88: Eight Progressive Senators Who Changed America.”

...


...as the lawlessness and disturbing behavior continues...the firings, the Prayer Breakfast, the unhinged tweeting, and of course, Bolton's book, this will continue to play out.

I respectfully disagree that it was "The Democrats" that made fools of themselves. I suspect history may agree with my opinion as the many criminals associated with this administration continue to speak up as they attempt to reduce their own prison sentences. This isn't over yet.

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