Forum: Folk / African Dance

Kizomba? Funana?
By Ursula_Mayor
On Fri Dec 17, 2004 04:21 PM

Generally, the posts about African Dance here refer to tribal Dance and afro-caribbean folklore.
I was wondering if anyone here was into other African dances, especially the ones from portuguese-speaking countries (Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, São Tomé & Príncipe), like Kizomba, Funaná, Deka or Kuduro...

May Terpsichore guide your steps.
*SuMay*

2 Replies to Kizomba? Funana?

great!!
By Ammy
On Tue Jan 04, 2005 08:44 AM
im very interested!!!
I would love to learn about that..i hope its ok if i dont know it cause to me its a very new thing all about african dances...but id love to.
I lived sometime in brazil so im use to some sort of dances that may be somehow related.
re: Kizomba? Funana?
By Ursula_Mayor
On Wed Jan 05, 2005 08:22 PM
Hi there. It's good to know that you're interested in these dances.

Well, the dances I've referred are mainly party and recreational dances and have a few european influences, so they don't have that much of a religious, social or territorial function as some tribal dances.

Kizomba is a pair dance, that is basically "slow dance" from Angola. Have you ever heard the song "Aisha" (sp?)? That's a sort of kizomba. In other places, they call it kola love.

Kuduro is also from Angola and has a much more rythmic pace. Decoposing the word, it means "stiff" or "hard" (duro) "butt" (ku). So, it's basically all about shaking the bottom and pelvic area. The song "Work!" from the Masters at Work is similar to the sound of Kuduro. The root of this dance is in Semba, a traditional dance that also evolved to the brazilian Samba, when it migrated to South America. Kuduro is more like a modern approach to the tradition dances in night clubs. There are also line dance choreographies for Kuduro. Imagine something like the "Electric Slide" faster and danced to african music. Fun, heh?

Deka is also a recreational dance, but from Guinea, Senegal and Congo. The main difference between it and Kuduro, besides the music is that it involves more motion and travelling steps.

In Cape Verde, you have mostly pair dances. Funanná is one of them and when you watch it, it's very similar to Merengue. There's also Coladera, Morna, Mazurka (totally different from the European one) and an interesting women's dance: Batuco. This is more connected with the original african dances and it's only danced and played by women. After work, they usually sit in a circle and make their own percussion with cloth bags filled with sand. They sing about their lives and one or two women go to the centre at a time to dance. It's sort of the Belly Dance from Cape Verde, but less focused on the womb - more on the hips. The cloth they wear over the skirt (often used to make a marsupial for the babies or to put under the water bowls on their heads) is used around the hips to enhance the movement.

This is wat I've learned from the contact I've had with these dances and kinds of music. Some people in Portugal practice thse dances, since there are lots of African inmigrants here.
I was wondering if there are people doing them as well in other countries, both in Europe and America.


May Terpsichore guide your steps.
*SuMay*

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