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The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets (karma: 30)
By PlaidSkirt11member has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 2520, member since Wed Dec 29, 2004
On Sat Apr 09, 2005 05:12 PM
Edited by PlaidSkirt11 (117662) on 2005-04-09 16:59:41
Edited by PlaidSkirt11 (117662) on 2005-04-09 17:22:57
Edited by PlaidSkirt11 (117662) on 2005-04-09 17:29:18
Edited by PlaidSkirt11 (117662) on 2005-04-09 17:29:41
Edited by PlaidSkirt11 (117662) on 2005-04-09 17:30:04
Made sticky by Theresa (28613) on 2005-07-09 17:16:48

This is Just to clear some things up. Hope it really helps you all with the FACTS!

Everyday, 10,000 humans are born in the US but 70,000 puppies and kittens are born as well. 40,000 dogs and cats are killed just in New York City shelters each year simply because they have no homes. Help fight pet overpopulation and euthanasia by preventing these births... so they don't end in death.

Still not convinced? There are many reasons that people don't want to spay/neuter their pets... but these are not based on fact; rather, they are common myths.

MYTH: It's better for my pet to have one litter before being spayed/neutered.
TRUTHIt's never better to have a litter. Allowing your pet to reach sexual maturity without being spayed and neutered increases his/her chances of getting breast tumors, uterine infections, testicular cancer and prostrate disease. Allowing your female to have a litter puts her at risk for dystocia -- complicated pregnancy -- which can be fatal.

MYTH: My pet has to be at least six months old before being spayed/neutered.
TRUTH: Spaying and neutering can be safely performed when the pet is eight weeks old or weighs at least two pounds. In fact, the younger the pet, the faster it will recover from the surgery. Spaying/neutering at a younger age also prevents cancers and infections.

MYTH: My pet is so beautiful I want to have another one exactly like him/her.
TRUTH: You cannot replicate your pet unless you clone it. When you breed your pet, his/her genes will mix with the genes from his/her mate. Puppies and kittens will not be exactly like the mother or the father and there will never be another pet just like the one you already love.

MYTH: I can make a lot of money by selling the puppies and kittens.
TRUTH: This is one of the biggest myths about breeding. Responsible "breeders" almost always lose money when breeding. With costs like stud fees, significant veterinary bills for the mother and puppies, food, and time off of work to care for the puppies, the costs quickly add up.

MYTH: I want my children to witness the miracle of birth.
TRUTH: Births don't have to be seen in person. There are several videos available at local libraries that your children can watch. Or, try contacting an animal shelter, which often times have near term pregnant mothers or nursing mothers that your children can observe. Finally, are you prepared for your children to witness death? Dystocia (complicated pregnancy) is not uncommon and the mother can die while in labor. Not all puppies and kittens survive as well. A miracle of birth can often result in the brutality of death.

MYTH: Everyone loves puppies and kittens!
TRUTH: This should not be the reason to breed your dog or cat! If you love animals please know that over 40,000 animals are killed each year in New York City simply because there are no homes for them. You wouldn't want any puppy or kitten that you brought into this world to end up euthanized!

MYTH: I already have good homes for the puppies and kittens.
TRUTH: Most animals that end up in shelters come from people who got them from a friend or neighbor. People start out with good intentions but then they have to 'get rid' of the pet because they're moving, develop allergies, have a new baby in the family or just didn't know what they were getting into and can't handle the responsibility anymore. Worse yet, how do you know these animals won't end up in a puppy mill, dumped on the street, used for fighting or sold to labs for experiments? Can you guarantee lifetime loving homes for your pets' offspring?

MYTH: I don't want to make my pet suffer through a painful surgery.
TRUTH: Animals are sedated to be spayed/neutered, which minimizes pain, and are also given an injectable pain killer. With proper care afterwards, your pet will be quick to recover. When your unneutered pet gets cancer or infections later, your pet will suffer more because often times, you won't be able to detect those illnesses early enough.

MYTH: My pet will get fat after surgery.
TRUTH: Weight gain results from lack of exercise, not spay/neuter. Be sure to give your pet adequate exercise and don't over feed your pet to prevent weight gain

----
Acquiring a puppy takes a lifetime commitment on your part. Dogs can live upwards of 15 years if they are healthy, so it is not a decision to be made lightly. It is essential that you choose to share your life with a dog for the right reasons, otherwise you can make both yourself and the dog miserable.

The Wrong Reasons

I want to be able to make money off the puppies.
Having a litter of puppies is a terrific way to put yourself in debt. The costs of breeding are astronimical, and accidents can happen that could cost you both mom and pups. Breeding is best done by people who make the breed their life, and breed for ideal temperament. Breeding a dog for money is a real myth.


***THE DEAL ON SPAYING AND NEUTERING***
1. Will my dog or cat be a better pet after altering?
Yes. In addition to the benefits of not having heat periods and unwanted offspring, the animal’s tendency to roam is decreased. Most pets become less aggressive toward people and other animals.

2. What are some of the other known advantages of having my pet altered?
The neutered male cat has a decreased urine odor, less of a tendency to fight and roam, and it is far less inclined to mark its territory by spraying urine.

The neutered male dog is also less likely to roam, mark territory, and display aggression toward other dogs.

Neutered dogs have fewer prostrate problems, tumors around the anus, and decreased urine odor.

The spayed female cat and dog do not have reproductive tract disease problems and both are troubled with significantly fewer cases of mammary cancer.

3. What is actually done in a spay or neuter procedure?
In both cases, the animal is put under general anesthesia so that it cannot feel anything.

A spay surgery (also called an ovariohysterectomy) is performed on females. While performed routinely, an ovariohysterectomy is a major surgery in which the reproductive tract – including the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and uterus – is removed.

Neutering refers to the castration of a male animal. It is a surgical procedure in which both testicles are removed. Neutering requires considerably less time and equipment than a spay surgery.

4. How old should my pet be before surgery?
The best way to decide on a timetable for your particular pet is to consult with your veterinarian. Current research has shown that, in general, it is safe to alter dogs and cats as early as eight weeks of age.

5. Should the female have a heat period or a litter before being spayed?
If your pet is going to be a companion animal rather than a breeding animal, then there are no benefits to allowing her to have a litter or to go through a heat period.

It is actually healthier for your dog or cat never to experience a heat as it lessen’s the animal’s chance of getting mammary cancer and decreases the animal’s stress and risks due to pregnancy and delivery.

Research indicates that dogs spayed prior to their first heat have less than a half of one percent chance of experiencing mammary cancer as compared to an eight percent chance after the second heat.

Cats spayed after their first heat have a seven times greater chance of suffering from mammary cancer than cats spayed prior to their first heat.

6. Is it safe for a dog or cat to be spayed when she is in heat or pregnant?
Females in good health can have the surgery done when they are in heat or pregnant. Talk with your veterinarians as to what is best for your pet.

7. Isn’t it unnatural to deprive my pet of a sex life?
No. Dogs and cats have sex strictly to satisfy hormone-induced instincts, not for pleasure.

8. Why shouldn’t I just keep my female dog or cat confined while she is in heat?
You can do this, of course. But remember, your unspayed dog will come into heat twice a year for its entire life. A cat comes into heat once a month for its entire life. Also, do not forget all of the health benefits to your pet by having it spayed.

9. Will spaying or neutering my pet cause it to become fat and lazy?
No. Weight gain is due to being fed more calories than the animal uses. Watch the quantity of food you give your pet. Also, older pets need fewer calories than younger ones because they tend to be less active and are no longer growing. Regular play and exercise, along with diet, are the keys to keeping your pet in shape.


Sources:
dogs.about.com . . .
www.aspca.org . . .
www.oregonvma.org . . .

48 Replies to The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets

re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By JoyNoellePremium member Comments: 3864, member since Fri Feb 04, 2005
On Sat Apr 09, 2005 06:01 PM
What a wonderful, wonderful post. Thank you so much for taking the time to post it.

I'm always afraid--after I've given one of my standard spay/neuter sermons--that someone will take offense, although, frankly, I really don't care if they do. The pet overpopulation problem is something I feel very passionately about and will not rest until things improve. And I'll certainly continue being vocal about it!

When I look at some of my current pets, I WISH I could replicate them...I wish I could have an endless supply of clones because they're so special to me. But that doesn't mean that I regret having had them spayed/neutered as soon as they were old enough. I understand the desire to recreate a particularly special pet, but the thing is, you can't! There's no guarantee that a son/daughter of a special pet will turn out to have the same personality as the parent(s). Not only that, but I speak from experience that it's really more about nurture than nature anyway.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Munkensteinmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 14381, member since Mon Aug 11, 2003
On Sat Apr 09, 2005 06:35 PM
I just want to add...about the age for spaying/neutering. Our vet told us it was four pounds or six months of age, whichever happens first. Early spaying/neutering IS possible, but not all vets will do it.

Thanks for the post. A lot of people need it.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Pointedancermember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 4291, member since Tue Apr 02, 2002
On Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:58 PM
GREAT post! :) People just dont seem to realize what they are doing when they breed their pets. Yes babies are SO adorable but if you love the animals so much then do you want to be responsible for the death of up to twelve of these gorgeous creatures (I am not really sure the maximum amount in a litter)
That said I did have baby guinea pigs but I stand my ground and I dont believe I did the right thing but it wasnt my choice, my parents wanted baby guinea pigs so we got baby guinea pigs (no amount of me giving them the 'no breeding, killing shelter animals' spiel worked, fortunatly they allowed me to keep two (I know that I wouldnt have gotten two more pigs as we already had two) of them and the other two went to good friends of mine) but still I realize that my/our actions caused equally deserving shelter animals to be without a loving family.
Please think carefully! :)
Pointedancer
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By JoyNoellePremium member Comments: 3864, member since Fri Feb 04, 2005
On Sun Apr 10, 2005 10:04 AM
Our vet told us it was four pounds or six months of age, whichever happens first.

This is a good rule of thumb, but not for all dogs. My kids (Great Danes) reached four pounds at about two weeks. No vet would--or should--spay/neuter a puppy at two weeks.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets (karma: 1)
By hylndlasmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 7170, member since Wed Sep 22, 2004
On Sun Apr 10, 2005 01:05 PM
Good post...

There are so many homeless pets out there...why add to them???

You can't say its because you are looking for a pure bred dog...because there is even an abundance of pure bred dogs that are looking for homes...be kind get your pets fixed.


Even better....go get a mutt. lol

Maggie
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Munkensteinmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 14381, member since Mon Aug 11, 2003
On Sun Apr 10, 2005 04:16 PM
Know what phrase I forgot to add? "for cats." I always assume everyone knows I have cats because I've posted about them so much, hehe. I don't know the rule for dogs, heh. Sorry to scare you. ;)
Thank You For This Posting
By Cindy3 Comments: 2600, member since Fri Aug 27, 2004
On Sun Apr 10, 2005 04:30 PM
I appreciate you calling attention to this basic and important problem. I think it is very important for people to be responsible pet owners.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Napolimember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 1622, member since Fri Mar 19, 2004
On Mon Apr 11, 2005 08:23 AM
Thanks for the great post! I live with registered boxer dog breeders and they are very careful who they sell their dogs to. The puppies are due at the end of June and there are already over 60 people on the waiting list. If the puppies aren't sold to other approved registered breeders, there is a spay/neuter contract. I've heard crazy stories about people trying to breed their dogs.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By JoyNoellePremium member Comments: 3864, member since Fri Feb 04, 2005
On Mon Apr 11, 2005 10:33 AM
Know what phrase I forgot to add? "for cats." I always assume everyone knows I have cats because I've posted about them so much, hehe.

I have cats, too, and you know what's funny (or sad, depending on how you look at it)? Most of my cats outweigh small dogs by several pounds. So the 4-pound guideline struck me as possible for cats or dogs!

My new kitten is growing at a normal rate, i.e., she hasn't gotten fat yet, much to my vet's glee, and I'm hoping she'll stay this way.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Munkensteinmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 14381, member since Mon Aug 11, 2003
On Mon Apr 11, 2005 07:15 PM
^Hehe, one of my boys is eleven pounds already! (About seven months old) He's massive...not fat, just massive. I'd imagine he could kill and eat our neighbors' puny little dog. ;)

They probably have much more complicated rules for dogs since they can range from five pounds to more than the average human. :)
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By JoyNoellePremium member Comments: 3864, member since Fri Feb 04, 2005
On Tue Apr 12, 2005 09:18 PM
^^ Eleven pounds, eh? He's going to be a big boy! That's funny about him probably being able to eat your neighbors' puny little dog! When anyone does anything to make me mad, I threaten them by saying I'll have one of my [fat] cats sit on them!

I have three that are over 16 pounds. Two of them are approximately 6 and 10 years old (they were adults when I adopted them), the other I know to be 14 (he was a BABY when I found him). All three of them LOVE to eat, and I have to measure out their "reduced calorie, less active, mature cat, with hairball control" food so they don't explode. Then I have a 15-year-old who has NEVER liked eating, so he was never fat, but has gone down to about 8 pounds. I should add that he was supposed to die two years ago, as he's in renal failure, but he had other ideas. He's been on prescription food and is doing really, really well.

And then, of course, there's my new baby that I'm hopelessly in love with! And she's growing nicely at about a pound a month, which my vet seems to like. :)
marvellous
By inzer Comments: 15, member since Wed Apr 13, 2005
On Thu Apr 14, 2005 11:20 AM
i am really impressed by the way you defined everything in so details, i also love pets and if i say i love them i mean it, i am planning to open an organisation in my country for pets and animal rights, i am trying to contant as many individuals as organisations, please assist me in achieving the goal and purpose of my life, regards, inzer
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By califeisgirl Comments: 2439, member since Thu Mar 21, 2002
On Thu Apr 21, 2005 01:22 AM
But but if everyone spayed and neutered I would have never found my beautiful stray dog with a wonderful personallity. Or my cat who is the best mouser on the street. :) Both of them have been "adjusted" of course.
I'm odd, but I have a thing for mutts. Some of the most beautiful pets I've ever seen are complete mutts.
Of course, people still need to spay and neuter their pets though.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Munkensteinmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 14381, member since Mon Aug 11, 2003
On Thu Apr 21, 2005 06:59 PM
^Cats and dogs die every day because they can't find homes and the shelter can't afford to keep them. I don't think that encouraging spaying/neutering is much of a threat to the population.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By highlandlassie Comments: 2895, member since Wed Feb 18, 2004
On Mon May 02, 2005 02:24 PM
FANTASTIC post, I am rating you up. This is such an important issue. I would like to add to it. PLease please please get your pet from a shelter. There are so many pets needing homes, that honestly, there is no more reason for breeding animals. Plus, there are soo many irresponsible breeders out there! Please don't give them the money they need to stay afloat!!
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By bunnyr Comments: 609, member since Tue Jun 22, 2004
On Sun Jun 26, 2005 12:14 AM
Don't forget that if you are a bunny owner, you also should spay or neuter. Rabbits breed like....

The Animal Rescue League (at least in offices in New England) has recently had an upsurge in bunnies, so I thought I should mention it.

I see you have six recs for your post. Time to make it 7.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By calico_cooper22 Comments: 724, member since Wed Nov 17, 2004
On Mon Jun 27, 2005 05:42 PM
Thank you so much for posting this!! That's exactly the reason why I (and my parents) will only get a dog from a shelter. I mean, we've saved 2 dogs from death! It makes me so sad to see all these dogs who are in shelters and put down just because they're not "purebred." There's no difference between a purebred and a mutt, just mixed genes. They're just as sweet as purebreds, maybe more, depending on the dog. Save an animal; adopt from a shelter!
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Depressed_girlmember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 84, member since Tue Jun 14, 2005
On Thu Jun 30, 2005 12:11 PM
so true that happend to my dog
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By jugglingdancermember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 367, member since Thu Apr 28, 2005
On Sat Jul 02, 2005 12:40 AM
Edited by jugglingdancer (129542) on 2005-07-02 00:37:37
Hehe, even my rats are spayed!

And in response to all of the fat cat posts, my friend (who's fourteen) has the same size waist as one of her cats! Lol, and my waist's just an inch bigger.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By AutomaticTeapotmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 1318, member since Mon Jan 31, 2005
On Sun Jul 03, 2005 09:09 PM
Fabulous thread!
Who else thinks this is sticky material?
The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By ballet44 Comments: 62, member since Tue Jun 21, 2005
On Wed Jul 06, 2005 10:25 AM
EXCELLENT post. My dad is a veterinarian and I have had firsthand experience with the bad effects of NOT spaying or neutering. Thank you for your accurate and factual post.
Ballet44
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By JoyNoellePremium member Comments: 3864, member since Fri Feb 04, 2005
On Sun Jul 10, 2005 10:09 AM
I am SO GLAD to see that this was made a sticky. I really hope that keeping it visible will encourage people to read it and, more importantly, heed its advice.
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By Primadonna Comments: 1406, member since Wed Oct 31, 2001
On Sun Jul 10, 2005 09:12 PM
Let me join the ranks of people who are saying THANK YOU for saying this. I am a dog trainer and it frustrates me BEYOND BELIEF, some of the misconceptions that people have about spaying and neutering.

I also commend you highly for mentioning responsible breeding. That is a subject that a vast majority of people are ignorant about and there needs to be much more education going on.

Primadonna
re: The REAL deal about spaying/neutering and Breeding your pets
By lacey_graham69 Comments: 370, member since Wed Jul 07, 2004
On Sun Jul 10, 2005 10:38 PM
that was an awesome post. thank you for taking the time to talk to us about that.
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