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re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By lovetap5678 Comments: 29, member since Tue Sep 29, 2009
On Wed Oct 21, 2009 07:32 PM
This is such a good guide. I have to create a piece for a school project and i am going to follow this like it's my Bible. Thank you!
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By minddancing Comments: 1, member since Thu Feb 18, 2010
On Thu Feb 18, 2010 07:30 AM
This is Great. I have used this concise summary in my choreography classes for the last four years. -- So I thought I should publicly thank you. All my students know and appreciate "Muffinhead". One of them even did a dance about you last week.
LPerson, Ph.D., Nazareth college -- Let me hear what you are up to. lperson1@naz.edu
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By ChristinePremium member Comments: 6817, member since Wed Feb 04, 2009
On Thu Feb 18, 2010 07:48 AM
Still Crazy(GOOD!)After All These Years.

Keep On Dancing!
xoxo
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By Fun_In_Phoenix Comments: 14, member since Tue Feb 16, 2010
On Sun Feb 21, 2010 01:12 PM
These were my favorite parts:
-- Dances are usually too long.
-- Good endings are necessary, they are 40% of the entire impact of the dance.
-- Monotony is fatal. Dynamics are important.
-- Don't be a slave to the music.
-- Don't intellectualize. Just move sometimes. Don't think as much.

Thanks for bringing this information. Too many of us have to go without formal choreography training. Like lots have said, we can teach ourselves, but I, for one, am all for getting help and wisdom from others.
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By mid_east_dancer Comments: 21, member since Thu Apr 15, 2004
On Tue Sep 28, 2010 01:59 PM
thank you aprime
that was inspiring
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By Beatrice1 Comments: 22, member since Fri Oct 29, 2010
On Fri Oct 29, 2010 05:31 AM
Wow! this is so very very interesting, thank you for posting this - im sure this will help me in my studies
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By StardancerTiamember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 5074, member since Sat Jan 28, 2006
On Sun Feb 06, 2011 10:09 AM
I find this to be very useful thank you...

Tia xx

Comment #9524898 deleted

re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By ssdancePremium member Comments: 42, member since Tue Aug 12, 2003
On Sun Apr 29, 2012 07:10 PM
I was JUST doing a little reviewing on this on my own with my Humphry books etc b/c I am creatively constipated right now- I took notes etc.. now I am going to print THIS out- Thank you!!!
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By MuffinHeadmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member Comments: 5172, member since Thu Jun 10, 2004
On Mon Aug 19, 2013 07:39 PM
I'm so happy I remembered this existed. I have to teach a choreography class this week and I've been looking EVERYWHERE for my notes. And then I remembered I'm awesome. :)
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By Kris13 Comments: 8, member since Tue Aug 28, 2012
On Tue Sep 10, 2013 04:02 PM
LOVE IT! I think You explained the fundamentals of Modern and Choreography Perfect! Great Job
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By Kelinw Comments: 25, member since Fri Jan 09, 2009
On Mon Jan 20, 2014 11:07 AM
Great!
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By Kelinw Comments: 25, member since Fri Jan 09, 2009
On Mon Jan 20, 2014 11:08 AM
Great! This post is a good tool to start off with for choreography.
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By Moonedance Comments: 6, member since Wed Nov 16, 2011
On Mon Jan 27, 2014 11:56 AM
Labanotation (Rudolph Laban) and The Bartenieff Fundamentals were used greatly in my college dance major's program of study when we got to doing our own compositions. The improvisation classes and excercises also definitely helped to take us out of our own "creature of habit" boxes. Not every dance needs to "fill the kitchen sink" with every thing you have. Try to be simple and create your own movement instead of all just looking like a series of connected class exercises.

**THE DYNAMOSPHER** was Laban’s term for the imaginary structure that illustrates the eight basic efforts. This Laban cube was my favorite because it gives you 8 different quality combos of Weight (strong or light)/ Focus (direct or indirect)/ Time (quick or sustained). Its planar movement can then help you take the same move and do it 8 different ways so your work can be more multi-dimensional.

Focus on level changes as well. Not just with one dancer, but can you create say an 8 count that could be done with minor manipulations to it that say 1 dancer does it as floor work, 1 mid level with plies/ no higher than standing, and one on high level including lots of releves and jumps. ( doesn't have to be completely exact but visually i t could feel that way. Or maybe they all do the same 8 count phrase but at one point some one does a roll, some one does an unwind with a Space hold of their head, and someone does a barrel leap. All using the same arms and space hold of the head.

One more note about the DIRECT vs. INDIRECT focus... most people truly understand the concept or direct focus ( focus with intent), however INDIRECT FOCUS is usually misunderstood. INDIRECT FOCUS is NOT seeing nothing, it is in fact seeing everything, but nothing specifically. Think more like when a kid walks into Disney Land for the first time....the wide eyed trying to take it all in. It is INDIRECT because you see everything, not just one thing, so do not feel like you need to avoid using you eyes or closing them in order to be "indirect"

Take a look at some of these links to help you more fully understand your movement in order to then add different qualities.

movement.nyu.edu . . .

movementhasmeaning.com . . .

en.wikipedia.org . . .

movementforactors.wikispaces.com . . .

movementforactors.wikispaces.com . . .

savannahindigo.wordpress.com . . .

I know that is a lot of reading, but seriously GREAT information to know whether choreographing or teaching and improvisation or composition class.



Lastly, I loved doing "Site Specific" works, which were pieces choreographed that could only take place in that specific place. For example, on a stairway outside the library... The size of steps and placement of railings wouldn't be exactly the same else where. Take into account if there is a specific place that you would like the audience to view the work from, because that could give them a different feel. For example, I did a work once on a bench in a hallway with a window above it. I had the audience stand in a room a across the hall with the door shut, so they had to watch it through the window. I wanted to create the sense of separation, so they could get the feeling of Isolation that I wanted to the dancer to have... if they stood in the hall with her, would they have gotten that same feel? Take everything into account. Do not feel tied to a stage space, think about the full 360 degree spectrum and only limit it if you actually mean to, not just because the stage means the audience is in "front of you"...maybe there is no front.

To take it a step farther, You can also allow the natural sounds and human interaction change the piece so it couldn't be the same twice.
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By Moonedance Comments: 6, member since Wed Nov 16, 2011
On Mon Jan 27, 2014 11:58 AM
Labanotation (Rudolph Laban) and The Bartenieff Fundamentals were used greatly in my college dance major's program of study when we got to doing our own compositions. The improvisation classes and exercises also definitely helped to take us out of our own "creature of habit" boxes. Not every dance needs to "fill the kitchen sink" with every thing you have. Try to be simple and create your own movement instead of all just looking like a series of connected class exercises.

**THE DYNAMOSPHER** was Laban's term for the imaginary structure that illustrates the eight basic efforts. This Laban cube was my favorite because it gives you 8 different quality combos of Weight (strong or light)/ Focus (direct or indirect)/ Time (quick or sustained). Its planar movement can then help you take the same move and do it 8 different ways so your work can be more multi-dimensional.

Focus on level changes as well. Not just with one dancer, but can you create say an 8 count that could be done with minor manipulations to it that say 1 dancer does it as floor work, 1 mid level with plies/ no higher than standing, and one on high level including lots of releves and jumps. ( doesn't have to be completely exact but visually i t could feel that way. Or maybe they all do the same 8 count phrase but at one point some one does a roll, some one does an unwind with a Space hold of their head, and someone does a barrel leap. All using the same arms and space hold of the head.

One more note about the DIRECT vs. INDIRECT focus... most people truly understand the concept or direct focus ( focus with intent), however INDIRECT FOCUS is usually misunderstood. INDIRECT FOCUS is NOT seeing nothing, it is in fact seeing everything, but nothing specifically. Think more like when a kid walks into Disney Land for the first time....the wide eyed trying to take it all in. It is INDIRECT because you see everything, not just one thing, so do not feel like you need to avoid using you eyes or closing them in order to be "indirect"

Take a look at some of these links to help you more fully understand your movement in order to then add different qualities.

movement.nyu.edu . . .

movementhasmeaning.com . . .

en.wikipedia.org . . .

movementforactors.wikispaces.com . . .

movementforactors.wikispaces.com . . .

savannahindigo.wordpress.com . . .

I know that is a lot of reading, but seriously GREAT information to know whether choreographing or teaching and improvisation or composition class.



Lastly, I loved doing "Site Specific" works, which were pieces choreographed that could only take place in that specific place. For example, on a stairway outside the library... The size of steps and placement of railings wouldn't be exactly the same else where. Take into account if there is a specific place that you would like the audience to view the work from, because that could give them a different feel. For example, I did a work once on a bench in a hallway with a window above it. I had the audience stand in a room a across the hall with the door shut, so they had to watch it through the window. I wanted to create the sense of separation, so they could get the feeling of Isolation that I wanted to the dancer to have... if they stood in the hall with her, would they have gotten that same feel? Take everything into account. Do not feel tied to a stage space, think about the full 360 degree spectrum and only limit it if you actually mean to, not just because the stage means the audience is in "front of you"...maybe there is no front.

To take it a step farther, You can also allow the natural sounds and human interaction change the piece so it couldn't be the same twice.
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By ForeverDancer1 Comments: 2, member since Tue Mar 11, 2014
On Tue Mar 11, 2014 06:09 AM
I'm just starting out in choreoraphy and this is amazing material.
Thanks Muffinhead for starting this - and the rest of you for the tips and additional information!
On to study this some more - and USE it in my choreography!
re: Simple Guide To Choreography
By K_Kay Comments: 36, member since Fri Aug 15, 2008
On Wed Jan 28, 2015 01:26 PM
I have a question for you. Have you ever heard of the B.I.R.D. method of creating group dances?
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