Forum: Gym / Rhythmic Gymnastics

Interesting report on RG
By Dream_chaserPremium member
On Tue Feb 21, 2006 10:43 PM

Scoliosis in rhythmic gymnasts.

Tanchev PI, Dzherov AD, Parushev AD, Dikov DM, Todorov MB.

Gorna Bania University Hospital of Orthopaedics, Spine Surgery Department, Sofia, Bulgaria.

STUDY DESIGN: An anamnestic, clinical, radiographic study of 100 girls actively engaged in rhythmic gymnastics was performed in an attempt to explain the higher incidence and the specific features of scoliosis in rhythmic gymnastic trainees. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the anthropometry, the regimen of motion and dieting, the specificity of training in rhythmic gymnastics, and the growth and maturing of the trainees, and to outline the characteristics of the scoliotic curves observed. An etiologic hypothesis for this specific subgroup of scoliosis is proposed. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The etiology of scoliosis remains unknown in most cases despite extensive research. In the current classifications, no separate type of sports-associated scoliosis is suggested. METHODS: The examinations included anamnesis, weight and height measurements, growth and maturing data, eating regimen, general and back status, duration, intensity, and specific elements of rhythmic gymnastic training. Radiographs were taken in all the patients with suspected scoliosis. The results obtained were compared with the parameters of normal girls not involved in sports. RESULTS: A 10-fold higher incidence of scoliosis was found in rhythmic gymnastic trainees (12%) than in their normal coevals (1.1%). Delay in menarche and generalized joint laxity are common in rhythmic gymnastic trainees. The authors observed a significant physical loading with the persistently repeated asymmetric stress on the growing spine associated with the nature of rhythmic gymnastics. Some specific features of scoliosis related to rhythmic gymnastics were found also. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified a separate scoliotic entity associated with rhythmic gymnastics. The results strongly suggest the important etiologic role of a "dangerous triad": generalized joint laxity, delayed maturity, and asymmetric spinal loading.

PMID: 10828918 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Taken from www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov . . .

Image hotlink - 'http://mk29.image.pbase.com/u26/wncheng/upload/43819848.NewFolderimage0004.jpg'

4 Replies to Interesting report on RG

Interesting report on RG
By ArielThomas
On Wed Feb 22, 2006 01:09 AM
NICE VERY VERY NICE PIC!!!!
re: Interesting report on RG
By Dream_chaserPremium member
On Wed Feb 22, 2006 07:10 AM
What did you think of the article?
re: Interesting report on RG
By PaoLaBeaR
On Wed Feb 22, 2006 03:48 PM
i didnt rally understand the article... are they saying that they found that girls who do rhythmic gymnastics are 10 times more likely to get scoliosis?
could you please maybe explain the article in simpler terms
THANKS!! :?
re: Interesting report on RG
By AnjieAngel
On Thu Feb 23, 2006 08:06 AM
The spinal problems would come from serious pressure on the bones in your back as well, not only from lack of food, etc. Girls break bones in their backs because of the pressure put on them, and that would come because of continuous stretching, not scholiosis (we're talking about young girls here). So there's a reason to the assymetric spinal loading, as well.

What I also miss about this article is that it's done only by men, I would like to see a few retired rhythmic gymnasts telling about they're experience. In my opinion, you cannot use only the mathemathics, there are other factors as well, especially when it comes to back problems.

Anyway, we see serious injuries in other sports as well.
I would also like to add that before the 2001 COP, RG was one of the sports with the fewest injuries. I think the required back flexibility we see now is the biggest problem for the sport, and I'm sorry to say this, but undernutrition was a problem in this sport earlier than this as well, I remember my old coach telling me about how they were weighed when they were in the gym, and how they had restrictions on what they could eat, drink, etc. This was in the 70's, so there's a long line back in time.

The delayed maturity is of course explained with the large amount of training from young age, which is known to delay the maturity process, because so much energy is used only in training and getting better. This study should probably be applied to every sport and dance which requires much training from young age (we don't add the back problems, as they usually are a RG problem). The sad truth is of course that when you reach a certain age, you can't get better. That's just how the life of a gymnast and a dancer is. The better you are when you are young, the better you will become when you're elder (generalisation, there are of course some exceptions).

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