Forum: Ballet / Ballet - General

Page:
Page 2 of 21 2
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By luvxx2xxdancemember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 1174, member since Thu Mar 05, 2009
On Sat Jun 05, 2010 03:49 PM
I loved this post! I took a modern class at this convention the local community college was holding with school and I loved it! It was one of the best hour and a half's I've ever spent! It just clicked with me. I have been doing ballet for a long time, but it feels so good to just let go and FEEL it! Oh and yea it was a little confusing at times, I wasn't really used to the kinds of things she taught but once I caught on it was great!
I kind of want more info on postmodern too, that sounds amazing! Just the randomness of it, and I loveeeee weird stuff!!! =o
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By cclovesdance Comments: 2, member since Fri Apr 30, 2010
On Wed Jun 23, 2010 10:34 PM
Great post !!
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By Doctor_Dancebelt Comments: 51, member since Sun Apr 25, 2010
On Sun Jul 04, 2010 10:17 AM
All dance disciplines can benefit from sharing moves from other types of dance. Best example is watching the current season of SYTYCD. This week Alex, a professional ballet dancer, wowed the audience and judges with a hip hop routine that featured ballet batterie.

Modern Dance is being re-defined as contemporary and ballet choreography is using more contemporary movement to attract new audiences.
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By Tyterope Comments: 176, member since Fri Jul 10, 2009
On Sun Jul 04, 2010 11:57 AM
^luvxx2xxdance... If that was your experience then you definitely should check out what offerings there are for modern/contemporary dance in your area... You'll probably click with a few different techniques and open up a whole new opportunity for yourself. Don't limit yourself if you really feel strongly about learning more about modern. It's great that you have something new to be passionate about!
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By luvxx2xxdancemember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 1174, member since Thu Mar 05, 2009
On Fri Jul 09, 2010 03:14 PM
Thank you Tyterope! =]
I take dance at school where we do some modern and contemporary and for our concerts I always audition some kind of contemporary dance=]
And at my studio all I took was Ballet, but I'm asking my mom if I can sign up for Ballet/Contemporary.
Also I'll try to take some master classes or conventions that offer that style too! Haha I think I found my calling =]
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By acrosstheplains Comments: 49, member since Tue Jul 20, 2010
On Tue Jul 20, 2010 08:03 PM
Whoa...serious de ja vu right there. I feel like I've read this before...haha :]
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By ballerinepetite Comments: 220, member since Wed Jul 08, 2009
On Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:14 AM
I get love2dance! I'm such a perfectionist in ballet, and I easily beat myself up when I do something wrong and I'm constantly comparing myself to others, but modern just clicks for me. It makes me feel strong and so IN TUNE with my body, when I'm in that class, I'm fearless! It could be that I was in gymnastics for five years before I really got into ballet, but modern, for me at least, comes very easily and very smoothly. It's a great way to express yourself and really feel every muscle in your body and what it's doing, it's definitely a class I learn a lot from!
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By luvxx2xxdancemember has saluted, click to view salute photos Comments: 1174, member since Thu Mar 05, 2009
On Wed Jul 21, 2010 08:58 PM
^ Mhmmm I know exactly what you're saying. I feel fearless and it's funn to fling yourself on the ground and just GO for it!

Comment #9522007 deleted

Comment #9524884 deleted

re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By monstersaid Comments: 8, member since Thu May 19, 2011
On Sun May 22, 2011 07:19 PM
Hello.

Sorry,but no matter what I'd never give up on ballet.
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By EvaEvaS Comments: 4, member since Mon Jun 13, 2011
On Wed Jun 15, 2011 02:28 AM
"Modern" - I am so sorry, but I don't like this term (term, but not what it means). High level 'Modern dance' is build on the basis of classical movements, which are used in contemporary, new way, and in really good 'modern' companies every dancer should have strong, professional classical preparation, because 'modern' doesn't have its own methodology - style is depending of choreographer. Petipa also has been absolutely suprising, new and 'modern' choreographer in his times... (Maybe even 'vanguard') As Mozart and Chopin in music.
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By luceroblanco Comments: 789, member since Fri Oct 30, 2009
On Wed Jun 15, 2011 06:44 AM
The term "modern dance" has been used in the U.S.A. for nearly 100 years, since Isadora Duncan. In other countries "contemporary" is used. However, in the U.S. "contemporary" refers to contemporary ballet, which is different from "modern dance." The legacy of "modern" dance includes the internationally known choreographers, Ruth St. Denis, Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, Paul Taylor, Twyla Tharp, Mark Morris, José Limón, Horton, and many other lesser known choreographers. I don't know what you mean by "high level" modern dance. In the U.S. there are three well known techniques, Horton, Graham, Limón. Many choreographers and companies came out of these, and there are definitely modern dancers who make stuff up and don't study a particular technique, although that is less the case than it was 30-40 years ago.
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By EvaEvaS Comments: 4, member since Mon Jun 13, 2011
On Wed Jun 15, 2011 08:09 AM
Edited by EvaEvaS (236964) on 2011-06-15 08:48:27
Edited by EvaEvaS (236964) on 2011-06-15 08:53:51
Yes, I know it all... ! It is the same in Europe!! And we are learning about modern choreographers in our ballet schools... But thanks for your replay.

I think I don't have enough good English to explain everything what I would like, but I will try.

I don't want to say that I don't like modern or that it's poor. cause I also liked my modern classes. ButI think that it is best when it have some connection with classic.

Just.. Where are any theaters of Graham, Limon etc? Duncan..?? What are famous spectacles in this style, having wide public? Or schools with own modern syllabubs (prestigious!) making certificated, professional dancers every year? And (nowadays!) really famous dancers, like some classical are?


No, I don't think there really are this level modern dance centers...

Just - someone had invent for example bicycle and there is no way to make absolutely new bicycle, absolutely another. There is only possibility to make some improved, more efficent, with new look. But it will be still and forever bicykle. The same is about the dance. (little methapor)

But there is a lot of great contemporary spectacles where choreography includes some modern movements and its way of expression. Cause that is modern: movements and manner of expressionm but not 'school'. So, taht is someting great what is making dance culture richer.

WHAT I WANT TO SAY IN CONCLUSION WITH CONNECTION TO OUR TOPIC:

There are no just classical or contemporary, or modern dancers, but just - dancers, at all. The different between them is their talent - some are more effectively in one 'dance styles'. Real dancer should have full background - should be trained in any 'theatrical' dance style and next choose what is his/her best side in dancing...

So, there is a lot of myths about modern dance... And I think it fallows from strange public concept about modern, what is always standing as something disconected form classic... Maybe taht is even some of modern dance artists fault.



re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By AlwaysOnStagePremium member Comments: 7417, member since Sun Apr 18, 2004
On Wed Jun 15, 2011 08:12 AM
I think this would be an interesting discussion, worthy of it's own post. It's getting off-track from the original post, which is trying to dispel the myth than Modern is the easy, less-talented version of ballet.

If we are going to talk about Modern Vs Ballet, perhaps someone would like to create a post on the debate board?
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By luceroblanco Comments: 789, member since Fri Oct 30, 2009
On Wed Jun 15, 2011 07:35 PM
Well, we could, Always on Stage, but since this is the Ballet Forum, I doubt there would be many "educated" responses.

In the first place, there ARE schools that teach modern dance in the U.S. The Martha Graham School in NYC for one. Martha Graham also had a company, and as far as I know it still exists. Limón Company still exists, as does the Mark Morris Dance Company, Merce Cunningham company, Paul Taylor Co. and David Parsons Company. Louis Falco Company also existed in NYC and although the company disbanded before his death, the repertoire is still performed today. These are all modern dance companies. Horton, when alive had his own company and school (for adult dancers not children) in California. Alvin Ailey used to take classes there, and the Alvin Ailey Company still exists in NYC and is the most viable and well known (in terms of the 'general public' modern dance company in the U.S. They also have a school which trains both children and adults.

In universities in the U.S. modern dance thrives and all these styles are taught. I took modern dance BEFORE taking ballet and knowing ballet was NOT necessary to do it. The technique we were taught was that originated from Denis/Shawn and passed through to Limón. We did not use a barre in most of the classes--although some teachers did, but others used a warm-up done standing in center. Others used a floor warm-up. There was definitely a "technique" to it. I took one class that was based on Graham technique and it was quite different. There was NO barre used and was a floor warm-up. Contractions are intrinsic to Graham technique and those are not used in some other forms of modern.

I don't have any problem with dancers distinguishing themselves by the type of dance they do. There are simply some people who specialize in ballet, some in modern, some in jazz, some in tango, some in flamenco, some in Irish. There is nothing wrong with that and I disagree with your statement that the difference is "talent." No, the difference is TRAINING. To be a professional and at the top of the game in ANY dance genre you must be talented and you must be well trained. The difference between ballet and modern is the training (and in some cases the body).
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By caitydancerr Comments: 180, member since Thu Oct 27, 2011
On Sun Nov 06, 2011 02:09 PM
I agree entirely. Modern is just as hard as ballet. My dance school even requires that you take ballet to even try a modern class.

Comment #9804050 deleted
Removed by Theresa (28613) on 2011-12-08 19:45:43 You need to take questions like that to a trained medical professional, you can not ask them here.

re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By BalletBrain Comments: 50, member since Tue Jan 01, 2013
On Thu Jan 03, 2013 10:21 PM
I agree! I only knew ballet for many years, but I started taking a few modern classes at a camp one year. Ever since, I do a bit of modern and lyrical dances, especially when performing for a younger audience with no ballet interest. It's a challenge for me, but I really appreciate it!
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By Roseweave Comments: 102, member since Mon Apr 29, 2013
On Thu May 02, 2013 07:27 PM
To be honest it seems kind of pointless doing modern to me unless you really really like the style...

I've come to the conclusion that while the strict standards of Ballet are offputting, I may as well do it anyway. I've thought about modern as a supplement to Ballet to give myself a bit more variation but if it's going to be even harder it's probably pointless.

No insult to those who do modern, just from the point of view from an older beginner I don't see a reason to do it and it seems a bit dumb that there ISN'T a more prominent school of dance that's a bit more flexible in terms of standards.
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By Roseweave Comments: 102, member since Mon Apr 29, 2013
On Mon Jun 03, 2013 03:18 PM
Edited by Roseweave (258568) on 2013-06-03 15:21:00
loveballet101 wrote:

While i definitely think modern is difficult (and I look so awkward trying to attempt anything that isn't just classical ballet), I don't think it's right to argue that modern dancers have aesthetic requirements as rigorous as ballet. modern dancers must be muscular. ballet dancers must be lean, muscular, with long limbs, long necks, small heads, short torsos, arched feet, lots of turnout, back flexibility, etc.

i've had many modern teachers at my preprofessional school. the overwhelming majority have been EXTREMELY strong dancers. however, all but 1 of the 5 were former preprofessional ballet dancers who chose modern because they felt they weren't the right fit for ballet. 2 lacked turnout, 1 was a bit too large, 1 has EXTREMELY flat feet. that's the truth

i'm not arguing they're not talented. but modern dancers simply don't face the same standards. people can begin training in modern when they're in their late teens (if they've already been talking ballet), and join a modern company just a year or 2 later. to be a female ballet dancer, one must train for 7-10 years in general


If this is true I might reconsider quite a bit.

It depends what's defined as "Modern" dance? Like at the moment I'm getting involved with a sort of interpretative dance project, and there are 5 professional dancers involved as well. I'm curious as to what they're actually doing and what it would be classed as, but there does seem to be a lot of different sort of dance going on that's at the very least quite similar to modern but with less strict requirements.

I never had the option of being a professional ballet dancer, but I still really want to do Ballet. However I am looking for other ways on which to capitalise on that experience, because I want to use what I will have or what I intend to spend years building.

it seems like there are alternative productions out there, like the one I'm involved in, where you can use a discipline in various forms of dancer, especially ballet(I know one of the pro dancers in the group is a ballet dancer, it seems to lend itself well to artsy kind of projects), to perform with a "Professional" dance group, just not a ballet company.

This is what I'm going to aim for. So I guess to those who have been looking to do modern because they can't make something of themselves with ballet - consider sticking to ballet, or exploring any other style you want, and look around for alternative dance projects you can get involved in.

Chances are, if you can dance, someone will want to want you. And these sort of projects(at least the one I'm involved in) can be a lot more fun than being a "professional" too.
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By dancing_for_joy Comments: 76, member since Thu Sep 27, 2007
On Sun Sep 29, 2013 05:18 PM
I'm mainly a ballet dancer (learned many forms of dance, but I identify most with ballet and have studied ballet more seriously than other forms)...but I just took my first modern class in about 5 years!!! I have taken modern for a semester or 2, intermediate-ish level in the past...

My shoulders are sore beyond belief after 1.5 hrs yesterday...and i appreciate being able to 'let go' (tho i love the structure of classical ballet). i think its great for balancing out a strictly-ballet ballet dancer mentally and physically!!
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By swanilda338 Comments: 128, member since Wed Mar 13, 2013
On Sun Nov 09, 2014 09:14 AM
I love this post!!!
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By T_spoon Comments: 24, member since Tue Sep 02, 2014
On Fri Dec 05, 2014 11:28 PM
Amen to that! I may not be be a modern dancer but I have heard people speak of things like this and have never believed the whole "modern is easier/if you can't do ballet do modern" myth, though I've heard it thousands of times. I don't think this is true at all, so thank you for dispelling these myths!
re: "If you can't do ballet, you should do modern!" A few myths dispelled
By hannahlieberman Comments: 5, member since Sun Feb 15, 2015
On Sun Feb 15, 2015 01:01 PM
I agree with the argument of this post. Modern dancers should not be considered "ballet dancers who didn't make it." However, modern is a reasonable "fall-back" for ballet dancers. I, for one, absolutely love modern. I have one modern class a week and I always look forward to it. I am a ballet student, however, and that is my focus. I do not have the ideal ballet look. I am muscular and short. I gain weight and build muscle very quickly. Many teachers have told me that I would make a better modern dancer than ballet dancer, and that I have more potential with a modern career than a ballet one. I consider modern something that I love not as much as ballet, but as something I love enough to do for the rest of my life. When it comes time for me to look for work as a dancer, I plan to audition in both modern and ballet. I will select ballet over modern, but in the event that I do not get in any ballet auditions, I would take the modern dance opportunities.
Page:
Page 2 of 21 2

ReplySendWatch