Forum: Arts / Debates

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re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Thu Feb 04, 2010 07:34 PM
Today I had a preballet class that I taught. I had a new student who was trying out my class. She came in 10 minutes late and announced " You can't start without me, you have to wait for me. I'm the princess and EVERYONE waits for me". Without missing a beat I answered " No one is a princess in this class. Unless we are pretending to be ballet princesses".
The father looked mortified.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By d4jmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:50 PM
^At least he was mortified instead of agreeing with her, lol!
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:54 PM
I am not sure if he was mortified at her, or because I called his little princess out.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Cadbury_Eatermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 04:28 AM
*sigh* It's sad that people won't take the blame for the monsters they've created. Parents/the previous generation reponsibility to let the younger generation to grow into prosperous people. Maybe blame shifting isn't a generation mutually exclusive thing.

And really for the example questions for the test the only one that would seem to indicate a narcissiatic attitude would the I ruled a world it would be a better place. Thinking you are special person or that you can't live your life how you want (stupid question, everyone's actions lead to their lifestyle) seem to indicate that people have greater self esteem and the live the life the way you want to appears to be that people nowadays feel less opressed and more "free". Neither of these two things are bad.

If you make somone take a test entirely about themselves, they will appear nacissiatical.

Let's stop these generation bashing wars. There are like "The grade below us in school are so derro", "Ballet vs. hiphop!" type discussions. Stop beating the damn horse and embrace that we are different (seeing as considering oneself special is bad). Most people think they're generation or whatever they believe in is the best, because it's right for them and what they're used to.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By teenydanseur
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 05:40 AM
I'm IN this generation and I completely agree. I started really picking up on this in college, I would ask friends what their plans were when we graduated, and they would say "oh, yknow go to grad school and then be a famous artist". The goals in this generation are completely ridiculous without any hard work to back them up. Oh and, anyone else notice no one shows up on time for anything either? you schedule to meet up and they are at least a half an hour late and see no problem with it. It's ridiculous! I wonder if this is just an american phenomenon or if it occurs elsewhere?
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Munkensteinmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 06:41 AM
^ I think that attitude also begins with the parents much of the time. You sadly hear this a lot in the dance world--"Susie didn't place because the judges were awful! It was fixed! That teacher doesn't know what she's doing!" It shifts the blame so that little Susie has absolutely no responsibility for her own actions. If you messed up, it's someone else's fault.

Yeah, the parents are failing, it seems. They all think that their kid is "unique" or "special" in some way, so they raise the kid as such. Too much of this, "You can be anything you want to be when you grow up!" mentality.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By PogMoGilliesmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 07:56 AM
I've been teaching for 10 years, and what I've found is that the children I have now, who are the children of people who grew up in the late 70s to 80s, for the most part, have been taught by their parents that authority is earned not given, that you should spend your life searching for that one thing that makes you extraordinary- then live off it, and that effort counts for more than result.

So how do many (not all) of these kids act?
Teachers, Principals, Police and anyone else placed in authority should be challenged and ignored until they EARN your respect

Quit any activity or job that you aren't completely happy with, or that makes you work hard for success

Show little to no personal pride because it doesn't matter if it's good or not, you did it right?

If I don't get an A, or a 4, or a + or an Outstanding, then the teacher/coach/whoever is just judgemental and mean, and needs to change the expectations, because after all, I'm above average, and average is an A-.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 08:27 AM
Edited by Louise (29559) on 2010-02-05 08:28:46
^ Spot on about not respecting people in authority.

But isn't it strange, isn't it just deliciously ironic, how they're the exact same generation who demand respect at all times, regardless?

My teacher told me to straighten my tie, but that disrespects my individuality. I know I'm not supposed to smoke on the bus, but reminding me of that fact is disrespectful. You happened to catch my eye across a crowded bar, and gave me what I perceive to be a disrespectful look, therefore you're in big trouble. Do'nt corect my spelin, its disrispecfull.

And then of course you can take it to extremes. He disrespected me by looking at my girlfriend, so I'm going to lure him out to the underpass and stab him in the heart. Hey, I'm special, I'm allowed to do murdering.

...don't think I'm exaggerating. It has happened numerous times.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 08:31 AM
^ Wow Louise does that actually happen? That is beyond crazy, whats wrong with people? People can't demand respect, it isn't a right. People should have to prove themselves to earn some respect.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 08:39 AM
Edited by Louise (29559) on 2010-02-05 08:43:22
^ They're not going to respond to logic though, are they? :?

It's definitely happened. I'll do some Googling and try and come back with a link.

EDIT

That didn't take very long...

news.bbc.co.uk . . .
news.bbc.co.uk . . .
www.telegraph.co.uk . . .

...so I kind of merged two stories, but you get the picture.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Fri Feb 05, 2010 09:01 AM
^ Those teens don't really know what "respect" is in the first place eh? They are confusing terms of "respect me" with " Be scared of me, cause I'm a dictator"
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Cadbury_Eatermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Feb 06, 2010 12:59 AM
^Umm...I don't think that stabbing and bashing people to death is a thing that can be attributed to a generation. There's nutters in every generation. I think we here more of the shocking teen crimes because they are more publicized in the media.

Oh and has anyone ever noticed that those type of crimes seem more prevalent in England (the whole gang crime thing) and school shootings in America? In Aus, we don't have the problem with teens having guns and making gangs, because we have tight gun control laws? Most young people here have never seen a gun in real life. I've never seen a gun in real life.

Not all generation Y ers are dumb people that aren't respectful and demand respect. I hate a hypocrite no matter what generation they're from.
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Feb 06, 2010 04:12 AM
^ I did say that, when I introduced the concept of stabbings and murders, that I was taking it to extremes. No-one is foolish enough to believe that only 14 to 25 year olds are capable of that. I don't think anyone here is saying their generation is perfect either, we just happen to be discussing one generation's characteristics in particular. Not sure what part of that is hypocritical. Especially as I'm PART of this generation... :?
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Heartmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Feb 06, 2010 09:17 PM
have been taught by their parents that authority is earned not given, that you should spend your life searching for that one thing that makes you extraordinary- then live off it, and that effort counts for more than result.


I believe in all those things, was taught such by my parents, and just want to clarify.

Respect is earned, not given. Politeness is always given. Everyone deserves manners. But I don't have to agree with them. I will challenge rules that I find are unfair, I will ask questions if I don't understand something, and I won't automatically assume that because someone is older than me, taller than me, or in a position above me, that they know everything. I won't treat a 60-year-old any differently than I'd treat a 30-year-old. Everyone gets manners, but you earn respect.

I was taught that what matters in life is happiness. I should spend my life doing something that I love to do, or else there is no point. This especially applies to my career, because I will spend most of my life working. This does not exclude practicality. You must also earn a living. I love politics. Do I plan on being President? Hell no. Do I plan on someday working in the White House bureaucracy? Sure. My brother loves music. Does he plan on one day being a rock star? No. Does he plan on one day being a tour manager? You betcha. Love what you do, but also earn a paycheck.

As for effort? As long as I did my best, I should take pride in what I did. This does not mean that I don't try. It means I work my butt off, and I take pride in a B instead of an A, because that's still a good grade. It means I can be satisfied with second place, because at least I got a medal. Try as hard as I can, and then be proud that I tried.

As a member of this generation, I find that they are a bunch of pussies. However, we've got some good points. Mainly that we don't take crap. A low crap tolerance is a good thing at any age, you just have to balance it out with manners and common sense.

And, a little polite attitude is a good thing to have. Repeat after me: "I'm sorry, officer, but I'm going to have to ask you not to search my vehicle without a warrant." "Professor, I really don't feel like this was a fair question. Don't these two answers seem very similar?" "Excuse me, but this wasn't the price as advertised in your flyer. Could I please speak with your manager?" "No, doctor, I don't want to make that medication change. Can you explain to me why you want to do that?"

And so on, and so on, and so on.

All the previous generations turned out FINE. So will we. Stop whining and learn how to text message!
re: Has generation y become the "generation ME"?
By Ninemember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Wed Feb 17, 2010 07:21 PM
I'm a little bit young, and obviously my experiences are a minute sample size, but I'll share my $.02 anyway.

My parents are probably not typical, but they spent my entire childhood telling me I wasn't as good as I thought I was, that I can't do anything I want. I did extremely well academically, and on tests, especially very young. My parents wanted to remind me that my academic success didn't mean I was better than other people, or even that I was going to be successful. I hear about how I have a particular set of skills that happen to be measured, but that I'm not very good at a myriad of other things. I hear that grades don't measure intelligence and I shouldn't think that I am intelligent because of them. I hear that academic success isn't a good measure of "success" or happiness in the "real world" and that I don't have the skills it takes to be successful. I've never been told I can do anything I want to or anything like that, so I can't really relate to that problem.

The majority of my peers definitely don't appear self obsessed, and I don't think any of them assume that they deserve anything. There area always a few people with super inflated self esteems, but the majority of people I know are definitely not in that category at all.

Social networking, in my opinion, is about interest in others, not ourselves. I like facebook for sharing about myself, but for the most part I use it to find information about others. The site is designed so you see a lot of other people's information. To me the appeal of the site is to learn about other people. I don't think it's created a self centered vibe. I'll concede that we might be over documenting, but I'm not convinced there is a real harm in that. I know I like the amount of information my friends put out there. I like to see how their lives are going, and sometimes I'm just bored and want to look through pictures.
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