Forum: Arts / Debates

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re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By Kekoamember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:49 PM
^True that.

Sadly, there is a big gap between what a religion is supposed to be, and how the people actually practice it. Many modern day Christians are great examples.
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By LlamaLlamaDuckmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:55 PM
If the hijjab is supposed to be something worn as a part of being modest... why do I see so many women wearing them, and jeans that they are almost painted into?
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By panicmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Tue Mar 02, 2010 01:07 PM
^Uh, completely insensitive and judgmental. I've heard a lot of people make the same argument against women who wear a crucifix.
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By LlamaLlamaDuckmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Tue Mar 02, 2010 07:41 PM
True... but a cruxifix isn't a symbol of modesty...
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By Celebrianmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Wed Mar 03, 2010 08:48 PM
Edited by Celebrian (127245) on 2010-03-03 20:50:15
panic wrote:

Yeah well "back in the day" women were considered property of their husbands. And in a lot of Islamic countries, they still are.

Women wearing them are actually encouraged to speak their minds and excel at what they do best so the world can see them for them and their talents and skills, not for outer beauty.
Unfortunately, this is simply not true in most of the Islamic world. And that's not even a matter of debate. Just look at the statistics about the percentage of educated women.


I understand what you mean and no, things are not 'all good' in every country (Islamic or not) as far as treatment of women. But the Islamic block does have their own feminist movement and are looking to take care of their own struggle.

On a side note, I also looked at some statistics for females being educated in Islamic countries that would be considered very hard-line by us. As of 2006 In Iran, women made up half the college students and in some professions they made up about 70% of those graduating from their universities: news.bbc.co.uk . . .. As a result, socially, things are being shaken up.

In Saudi Arabia women make up more than half the university students attending college. www.mep.gov.sa Things are far from perfect since they are still barred from practicing certain professions, but with the trend in education being on the upswing for females it is only a matter of time before that is also turned on its ear.

I picked those two because they are modern in their technologies but also very strict and fundamentalist in their views and also polar opposites in their : one is sunni, one is shi'a. (I'm very interested in the statistics of other Islamic countries and will continue to look them up. It's been very interesting.)

I digressed: My original point was, for Muslim females who live outside the Islamic world, the hijab is optional. And if a female in a country where it is not law wears it, it's because she wants to wear it. She's not doing it for a male www.islamfortoday.com . . . or because she's forced to www.examiner.com . . .. She's doing it for reasons that make no sense to the Western world as a whole. But just because it makes no sense to the Western world, does that mean her reasoning is invalid? Does that mean we can assume she's doing it because she sees herself as inherently evil and in need of being 'tamed' or has she thought it out and given it deep consideration and weighed her own conscience? I would prefer to get the answer from Islamic women themselves who currently wear the hijab and practice Islam without the filter of western thinking attached.
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Mar 04, 2010 03:10 AM
My original point was, for Muslim females who live outside the Islamic world, the hijab is optional. And if a female in a country where it is not law wears it, it's because she wants to wear it.

That's very simplistic. It might 'technically' be optional, but if your husband or father is going to punish you if you don't, then of COURSE you are going to 'choose' to wear it. I'm not saying this happens in every Muslim family, but it happens often enough to be part of the debate here.
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By Celebrianmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:08 AM
^Often enough, that's true. I've known ladies from both sides of that spectrum (for an example of that from my own family you can PM me), but there are too many women out there who speak from their own mouths about it. Also, I've tried it. Once you try it yourself you might have a different slant on it.

Anyway, I've hijacked too much. :O

Sorry, OP, I won't do it anymore!
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By panicmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Mar 04, 2010 01:11 PM
But Weezy, my parents made me do LOTS of things I didn't appreciate when I was a kid. That's what parents do. Lots of Christian parents force their children to go to church under duress. Jewish parents make their kids dress modestly. So do Amish, Baptist, Mormon, etc, etc, etc.

I understand and agree with your point about covering women's faces, but forcing your kid to dress modestly or cover their head is hardly something to get worked up about. And it's certainly not limited to the Islamic community.
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Mar 04, 2010 03:19 PM
^ Agreed, but notice I didn't limit it to fathers/parents. I included husbands in that, too.

Also I realised too late that I didn't come across the way I wanted to there - when I said it was part of the debate "here", I meant Britain, not DDN. Oopsies.
re: Time-sensitive: Prayer in public school?
By Dream_chaserPremium member
On Sat Mar 20, 2010 09:34 AM
In the USA, so many religions are reflected in our public schools so to have one prayer session would be a tough thing. A moment for reflection, prayer or whatever makes the most sense.

There are parochial schools here (Mennonite, Catholic, etc.), that except kids of other religions but not sure how they handle that since I do not have any experience.
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