Forum: Arts / Books

****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By pointeless467member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Wed May 19, 2010 11:03 AM

Due to the fact that hardly anyone has gotten a chance to finish the book, no one sent me any book suggestions other than 1 person and no one sent me discussion questions besides that one person, discussion is postponed to June 3rd.

Happy reading! :)

14 Replies to ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****

re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By dancinqt5013member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Wed May 19, 2010 09:00 PM
Oh, I'm actually really relieved about this. I only started reading last night!
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By pointeless467member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Jun 04, 2010 11:59 AM
Discussion time!

Let the talking begin!
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By MarlaSingermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jun 04, 2010 12:25 PM
Do we have to put things behind spoilers? I'm assuming the point of the discussion is that everyone has read the book, right?
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By pointeless467member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Jun 04, 2010 12:56 PM
Right!
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By MarlaSingermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jun 04, 2010 01:01 PM
Okay, I have a question for discussion. Which character do you think Wilde identifies with most - Dorian, Lord Henry, or Basil? Or some combination thereof? In other words, which character(s) do you believe to be espousing Wilde's actual beliefs and philosophies?
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By balletsfriendmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jun 04, 2010 01:42 PM
^I think Lord Henry. All the things he brings up (especially in the beginning) to Dorian are very interesting and seem like they are prompted from Wilde's own life. I think that Wilde is evident in each character, but I find it mostly so in Lord Henry.
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By pointeless467member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Jun 04, 2010 01:46 PM
I agree on that one. Lord Henry definitely portraits Wilde's thoughts and philosophies more than any other character in the book.

Here's a question for y'all, though: Were you in the same place as Dorian - not knowing about the magiv painting etc - and had the power to change (since, obviously, he didn't seem to have it), would you?
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By Angelinamember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jun 04, 2010 03:41 PM
^ I'm not sure I understand the question properly. Do you mean if I was in the same situation as Dorian, would I change (not knowing about the painting)? I'm struggling to put what I'm thinking in to words!

I guess this is a situation that everyone is in - if we had a painting of our soul to look at, maybe we would think about how our actions affected other people more. Does that make sense? So I think that not knowing what our "portraits" look like, we have to do the best we can to be good people.

Is that what you meant?! Interesting question.
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By pointeless467member has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Sat Jun 05, 2010 01:05 AM
Yep, that is what I meant!

But I do disagree with you a little on that one. I don't think most people think of their souls as something that can be either "ugly" or "beautiful". Souls are just that, in my opinion. Souls. Therefor, I think I would have acted the same as Dorian and not care at all what my soul looks like, since it's not something "real".

You know what I mean?
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By MarlaSingermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Jun 05, 2010 08:56 AM
I don't actually believe in the concept of a soul, but it's kind of like when someone says about someone else, "He/she is a beautiful person," and you know they mean that it's who they ARE that's beautiful, not what they look like. And that is what I strive to be. Dorian was beautiful on the outside, but he was actually a horrifically ugly person in the way he acted and treated others. And have you ever noticed that when someone is an ugly person in that way, it affects the way you look at their physical appearance? I went to high school with a guy whose actions and behaviors were just hideous. Then later, I worked somewhere where he used to work, and the girls there were like, "OMG, you know him?! He's sooooooo hot!" I was like, "Really?" I'd never even been able to look at him that way because he was just an ugly person to me.
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By Angelinamember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Jun 05, 2010 12:33 PM
But I do disagree with you a little on that one. I don't think most people think of their souls as something that can be either "ugly" or "beautiful". Souls are just that, in my opinion. Souls. Therefor, I think I would have acted the same as Dorian and not care at all what my soul looks like, since it's not something "real".


Maybe people don't think of their souls as being ugly or beautiful, but if you could physically see your soul getting uglier and uglier, wouldn't you want to change it?

I guess a lot of it comes down to your own perception of a soul and how much it actually matters though... I agree with what Jonelle said (which she said much more eloquently than I did!).

I have a couple of questions:

- Does Dorian have any qualities which redeem him, in your eyes?
- What is the significance of Sybil Vane?

(I'm actually finding this really fun, doing all the background reading and thinking about essay questions. I'm such a geek :))
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By Nyssasisticmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Jun 05, 2010 05:12 PM
^Any qualities that actually redeem him? Not really. However, his WANT to be better at times is admirable, although his lack of follow through squashes it.

Sybil is the "event" that opens Dorian's eyes to what's going on, and I think it shows Dorian's true nature to the reader for the first time. She represented all that was innocent, sweet, and kind and when Dorian rejected her I think he rejected all those qualities as well.
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By dancingrl247
On Sat Jun 05, 2010 11:24 PM
I agree, I think Sybil represents the turning point for Dorian. Before that he was hanging around Lord Henry a lot, and certainly absorbing everything he was saying, but this was the first time he actually acted on his own in a way that was just down right immoral and evil.

And no, I don't think he had any redeeming qualities. Feeling bad a few times about what you've done doesn't rectify anything.
re: ****Attention: Fellow Bookclubbrers!****
By MarlaSingermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sun Jun 06, 2010 06:41 PM
I have to admit that in a way I admired Dorian's wholehearted pursuit of the enjoyment of life. I think a lot of us would do well to nurture that side of our personalities a little more. His problem was that he was not able to realize that caring about others is an important part of a truly fulfilling life. Everything in his life was about him, and eventually he even came to find enjoyment in ruining the lives of those around him. By the time he reached that point, no, I don't think there was anything redeeming about his character.

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