Poll: Arts / Debates

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re: Math or Maths
By majeremember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:54 AM
It is MATH. Maths feels gross to say. Oh, and even though I am American, I watch enough British TV and talk to enough Europeans that some English-English has slipped into my vocabulary, or at least how I say things in my head before I correct myself and say it out-loud because hardly anyone I know will know what I mean if I pronounce "garage" the English-English way instead of the American-English way. Some English-English spelling as well have worked it's way into my vocabulary. I have been known to put the "u" back into words and the "s" instead of the American-English "z."

However, I will never say maths. It is math.
re: Math or Maths
By d4jmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 12:08 PM
Here's a tongue twister: Try saying 'maths schedule' the British way!

:D
re: Math or Maths
By Chaconnemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 01:55 PM
It has nothing to do with Euphoria...it is simply euphonia. :P

Couldn't resist.

Jon
re: Math or Maths (karma: 1)
By Josianemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 02:03 PM
Neither. I don't say it... women are terrible at it anyways.
re: Math or Maths
By CheesePlusCakemember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 03:23 PM
Math... I really hate how the ths sounds. I can't even really say it out loud. When I add an S to the end of words like baths the th sounds more like the th in the than in bath. Do you say maths with a th that sounds like the or sounds like the th in bath?
re: Math or Maths
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 03:31 PM
Maths rhymes with baths as I pronounce it, but as the American accent is so different to the Brummie, I can't imagine that that will help you loads. If I say baths in my attempt at a nonspecific American accent, it's a longer a than I would use myself. Like baaaths, instead of a quick baths.

Although I've been thinking about it, and let's face it: Most British people say maffs anyway so the s is academic.
re: Math or Maths
By RAID_Babemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 03:40 PM
It's MathS. Saying Math sounds so wrong to me.
re: Math or Maths
By Merfi
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 08:27 PM
It's maths! Mathematics is a plural, so why shouldn't the abbreviation also be a plural?
I pronounce maths with a short "a" (as in "hat"), if that helps.
re: Math or Maths (karma: 1)
By ChristinePremium member
On Thu Jan 06, 2011 09:00 PM
This inter-continental quibbling is reaching a new level of idiocy.

Although most American do shorten mathematics to "math", there are times we do use the plural. For example, when examining degree requirements we might say, "I need three humanities, and 3 maths." Or, "because I'm a woman I suck at most maths except geometry."

If we all examined local differences in language we wouldn't need to cross oceans to find oddities. In New York we use vacuum cleaners to suck the dirt out of our carpets. In Pennsylvania we use sweepers. In the Northern states we bring our children to college. My cousins in South Carolina "carry" them up to Richmond. In New Jersey people go into diners all day long and order regular coffee to go. Try to place that order in Iowa and most likely you'll hear, "what do you mean by regular?" And "to go" is another subject entirely. Carry out...take away...

Spelling and pronunciation is even odder. The man wound his wound.
The list is almost endless.

Instead of bickering about which is correct, we actually have a wonderful opportunity here to broaden our horizons and expand our knowledge about the linguistics of our own mother tongue. Imagine an American child instructed to put something in "the boot". Or an English child told to put something in "the trunk" It is unlikely that either child would know that they were instructed to put something inside the luggage compartment of an automobile.
We could actually write an entire series of children's books like Amelia Bedelia, based on silly misunderstandings.

Keep On Dancing*
re: Math or Maths
By RileyA
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 12:41 AM
We call it maths in Australia.
re: Math or Maths
By PureTapPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 01:04 AM
Yep, agreed with RileyA - Maths in Australia. Short 'a' not long 'aaa'. Economics is shortened depending on what it's with. Home Ec for example, but if it is by itself, it's Economics.

Bath is not short for anything, which is why there is no 's' on the end, unless you are talking plural.

And Panic is just frightened of coming over here to Australia because he know's I'll hit him with a paternity suit for our virtual child...
re: Math or Maths
By Kekoamember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 02:13 AM
I voted Math because that's what Americans call it, but I read enough British literature and watch enough British TV that maths sounds fine too. I'm personally upset that we Americans don't use "u" in words anymore...colour looks so much better than color, and so on.
re: Math or Maths
By Brittanymember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 02:14 AM
Edited by Brittany (36942) on 2011-01-07 02:15:12 suck at this whole quote deal
Edited by Brittany (36942) on 2011-01-07 02:15:30
Mathematics is a plural, so why shouldn't the abbreviation also be a plural?


Mathematics are my best subject.
Mathematics is my best subject.

I'm going with the second one.


mathematics(math·e·mat·ics)
Syllabification:OnOff
Pronunciation:/maTH(ə)ˈmatiks, mæθ(ə)ˈmædɪks/
plural noun
[usually treated as singular]
the abstract science of number, quantity, and space. Mathematics may be studied in its own right (pure mathematics), or as it is applied to other disciplines such as physics and engineering (applied mathematics).
[often treated as plural] the mathematical aspects of something:
the mathematics of general relativity


Straight from the Oxford Dictionaries Online. The Brit dictionary. Usually = more often than often. Thus the most popular use is it as a singular. Thus no s.
re: Math or Maths
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 02:31 AM
^ Dude, they just meant that the full word has an s on the end so why shouldn't the abbreviation?

Why are Americans getting so damn arsy about this? As I asked previously, why do they recognise that we spell words like colour differently, yet this one is somehow abhorrent? I am really scratching my head over this one, although that may be because I slept with my hair in a ponytail and now my head feels funny.

Re bath...I know it isn't short for anything, it was brought in to the conversation as a comparison for pronunciation.
re: Math or Maths
By Brittanymember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 02:39 AM
Woah, did this just get serious or something? I thought this whole thread was all lighthearted humor...or humour if you wanna spell it that way. If you wanna read my reply as arsy then so be it but it was posted with total non-arsy non-seriousness intentions.
re: Math or Maths
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 03:00 AM
Didn't come across as being meant in a funny way, even to a Brit who understands sarcasm. Not when you're copying and pasting the dictionary, anyway. Although points for using the OED, most people go to Webster or dictionary.com or something :?
re: Math or Maths
By Lauretta
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 05:14 AM
It's Maths to me, because i'm English. However it doesn't particularly bother me that Americans call it Math, I don't find it gross or any other similar word you could put in that spot. As Louise said, I don't get why this is contested so strongly when we don't debate about other differences in our language. And i'm not just talking about DDN, the boyfriend (who studies Maths and wanted to research a bit about the debate) just googled and found a few other heated debates on the same subject. Maybe you might find a debate for whether colour has a u or not but I would doubt that it'd be very long.
re: Math or Maths
By PureTapPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 05:37 AM
^Okay, back to the English discussion. Louise, did you know that, in Australia, if someone is 'arsey' they are lucky...as in (usually said in an admiring tone) "What an arsey, arsey b*stard - he managed to get away with it!"

:D

God, I love the way we've totally screw up the Kings English in every which way we possibly can since the moment the Brits dropped the first boatload of convicts off! But then again, I absolutely love Cockney as well, so maybe I've got a predispensation to faulty language!

Back to your regularly scheduled (that's pronounced shed-uled, by the way, not skeduled!) programming and infighting about maths!

PS: Why does every phone number in the USA start with '555'. Haven't you guys run out of numbers to tack on to the end of that, yet? VTIC...
re: Math or Maths
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 05:43 AM
^ I don't know what VTIC stands for so perhaps you were messin', but in case you weren't, from what I can gather no REAL phone number starts with 555 in America. That's just what they use on TV to make sure they're not accidentally giving out someone's real life phone number.

I did not know that about arsey! Here arsy means, well, arse-like. Which in itself doesn't make any sense because how can one behave like an arse when an arse is your bottom? And why is it called a bottom when it's halfway down your body?
re: Math or Maths
By PureTapPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 06:09 AM
Sorry, VTIC = Very Tongue in Cheek...

Yep, worked out the 555 thing about 35 years ago, after having watched Sesame Street for about 8 years at that stage, and became curious why everyone's phone number all started the same! I think my Mum explained it to me.

Our arsey came from saying that someone has 'More Arse than Class' and it ended up being cut down.

Oh well, off to bed - it's 11.00pm and I'm guaranteed to be woken by a 5 year old at 6.00am, so I better go get my ugly sleep!
re: Math or Maths
By Munkensteinmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 06:19 AM
Here's why I prefer "math" to "maths," and it has nothing to do with where I live since I hate the way Americans say a lot of things. Say them out loud...saying a word that ends in "th" with an S makes it sound like a speech problem or something.

I once had a professor talk about that kind of thing and how she expects that English will evolve to drop some S's off of various words...like "specialists." She thinks that "specialist" will become the singular as well as plural, like moose, because ending an "st" word with an S makes it difficult to say and sounds funny. Who knows, haha.
re: Math or Maths
By Anon1234567890member has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 07:17 AM
Interesting theory, but perhaps it's down to accents since I've just said specialists aloud to myself a couple of times (thank God I have the house to myself...) and it wasn't hugely difficult to say. I have difficulty with words like lottery instead - although perhaps that's because I live near a suburb called Cotteridge and no-one would ever pronounce that in full - it's cot'ridge, so it must be lot'ry? Who knows?

I very much get the s following a th thing though - it's even worse when it's the other way round, like asthma? Can't say it, don't know anyone that can. We just say assma.
re: Math or Maths
By MarlaSingermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 07:24 AM
I say "math," but it doesn't bother me that others say "maths." One of the things I love about DDN is seeing how many variances there are in the English language, depending on where you live. I find it really fascinating, and I especially love seeing all of the different slang words and phrases, because those vary by region even within the same country.
re: Math or Maths
By Cadbury_Eatermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 09:04 AM
Mathematics shortens to maths. If it was just mathematic, then yes, it would be math. It does not sound weird when I say it, but some people say it more like Mass with an S on it. But it's not my problem people don't articulate their tongues onto the correct palate position and such.

Oh and I'd think that on a thread on MATHS that you Americans you'd understand skewed statistics from the demographic the poll is taken from :P
re: Math or Maths
By saor_celticmember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Jan 07, 2011 09:15 AM
Who would've thought that one tiny word could cause such an uproar. :)

I personally say Math, but it's what you hear in the US. I don't think I've ever heard someone say maths around here, unless they are pluralizing like Topphilly suggested.

I've also been known to add the "u" back into words or add the extra "l" back into some as well. Or even use the "s" vs the "z" but I think that's because of my British literature background/focus during college, that still slips in occasionally.
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