Forum: Arts / Pets

Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Wed May 04, 2011 11:46 PM
Edited by jazz_lover (99333) on 2011-05-04 23:48:27

I have a 10 lb dog. Right now he is mostly an outdoors dog that comes in during the evening to spend time with me. ( Sleeps in the bathroom). He hasn't had an accident at night, and he hasn't had one inside the house when he plays with me in the evening. ( As long as he goes out every 3 hours)
Because I got him as a puppy, I worked on housetraining with him. Therefore, I have a lot of pee stains on the carpet which is going to cost a lot to recarpet.
Right now, I am not 100% sure if my dog is housebroken. Because he stays outside all day with my brothers dog, I am not sure how he will handle being indoors all day. Whenever he goes to my bf's house and he is indoors, he doesn't seem to have an accident.

I am moving into an apartment with carpet. The only areas without carpet is the kitchen and the bathroom. I am really worried that he is going to pee on the carpet costing me the deposit.
I know that people crate dogs, but I would feel uncomfortable leaving the dog in a crate all day. I was wondering if the bathroom or the kitchen would be a better idea?

I will walk my dog once a day minimum; and take him out every 4 hours or so. I live right on campus, so I can run back to my apartment to let him out.

The most he is going to be alone is 8 hours ( Not at once, he will have potty breaks) That is about how long I will take classes. Either 4 hours/4 days a week or 8 hours/twice a week) depending on my school schedule. Would it be cruel to leave him in the bathroom or kitchen for that long?

In a nutshell, I am asking if it would be bad to leave him in the bathroom during the hours that I am not home.

I HAVE to take this dog with me, because my mother said that he won't be able to stay with my family. It is either taking him with me, or having to give him away.

22 Replies to Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?

re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By SaraTheGrouchmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 12:57 AM
You need to either crate train or paper train the dog. Its not right to keep him locked up all day. Period, end of story.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By punkgirl59
On Thu May 05, 2011 01:16 AM
Do you know how long he can hold it? I know this is an obvious solution, but can't you just house train him at the new house? I trained my dog when he was a puppy (and I believe he's a similar breed to yours - he's a yorkie/poodle mix) and I'm surprised at how long he can hold it. I live in a house, not an apartment, but when I was working full time, and he was potty-trained, he could hold it all day with no accidents at all. And it wasn't like he was bursting at the seams and uncomfortable all day, either. I just made sure that he was trained not to potty on the floor, and then gave it a test-run, left him alone for maybe 2-3 hours. No accidents, so I upped it a couple more, etc.

Now we're at the point where I could leave him home the entire day and he wouldn't pee on the floor (I don't do that, I'm just a stay-at-home mama now, but I could). In fact, sometimes if it's pouring rain or snowing, he just chooses to stay inside and hold it until it stops.

Anyway, that was longer than I meant it to be, but I would say just potty train him at the new house, and I'd be willing to bet he'd be ok to stay inside alone while you're in class.

~*~Punkgirl~*~

Long live punk rocK
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 09:47 AM
I did paper train the dog, but he would never go outside. ( He would only go on the paper). Now he goes outside when going for a walk; plus the yard.

I was wondering how you can papertrain a dog and let him go outside. He kept trying to pee on books and newspapers when I used those puppy pads. He didn't seem to know the difference of the papers.

I *think* he is housebroken, since he doesn't go potty at my boyfriends house. We let him out every 4 hours or so, and he always goes potty as soon as he gets out. I am not willing to lose a $2000 deposit for dog pee. Is there a good way to check he is fully housetrained before letting him roam?

I have about 2 weeks before classes start that he will be home with me all day. How should I go about this?
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By ChristinePremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:04 AM
Believe it or not, my dog loves his crate. I never had a crate for my other dogs, because I though it was like putting them in a cage. This one was a rescue and he came with the crate so I took it to help him with the transition.

Whenever the vacuum cleaner comes upstairs, he runs into his crate. When the kids are running around making him crazy, he goes in there. I rarely close the gate on it. He lets himself in at night to go to sleep and often goes there to nap.

I did some investigating and discovered that dogs are naturally cave animals. They choose protected areas. I then realized that my other dogs would love to sit under the table or under the front porch, even when they had the run of things.

If you get the crate now and start using it, it will be a familiar "home away from home" as your pup gets used to your new place.

Good luck.

Keep On Dancing*
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By imadanseurPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:10 AM
I don't know why you are opposed to crate training. It really is a much better solution than leaving him in the bathroom where he feels more confined. The crate will feel like a safe haven and a den when you train him correctly.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By Niennamember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:13 AM
I would also invest in some Nature's Miracle, you can find it at your local pet store. I have the formula that's specifically for cats and its truly a miracle worker for getting pet stains and odors out of carpet. Hopefully you'll never need to use it, but if puppy has an accident or gets sick, it may save you the deposit.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:15 AM
Edited by jazz_lover (99333) on 2011-05-05 10:19:59
^ Isn't the crate more confined then a bathroom? I was planning on using the bathroom as his "crate" while I am away, and then letting him roam the house when I am home. He will either be home alone ( I don't have my class schedule yet)
1. Twice a week for 8 hours.
2. 4 times a week for 4 hours.

At my current house, I used some odor/stain remover and THAT stained my carpet. Do you know what causes staining of a cleaning product on carpet?

What crate would you guys recommend? I used the typical Petco $24 crate for him, but it seemed so sad for him to be behind bars like that. I guess as you guys said, dogs are den animals so it is ok. I know you aren't supposed to get a big crate incase they use the bathroom, but what do you guys think of those doggy play pins? I can just put plastic under it so if he does have an accident, it doesn't effect the carpet.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By LlamaLlamaDuckmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:23 AM
I have a dog that pees everywhere... I use 1/3 vinegar 2/3 water and a spoon of liquid dish soap for pee stains... basically saturate it and blot it up with a towel... takes away the smell and the stain.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By ChristinePremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:26 AM
My dog is a 110 pound chocolate lab and he goes into his crate on his own to sleep. He even sleeps on his back, all four feet in the air and SNORES! I swear, I though it was cruel too, but he really does love it.

We've purchased all kinds of pet Mattresses too, and he chews them up and then pushed the destroyed bedding out of his "area". It is hilarious. In a million years, I never would have believed he could be so happy. The crate came from PETCO.

As far as stain remover goes, there is a product I get here that is called, "Spot Shot". It is amazing.

How old is your dog? He may be more potty trained than you think?

Keep On Dancing*
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By imadanseurPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:30 AM
Dogs view the world differently than people. Crates are not cruel and leaving them in a bathroom is not giving him a ton of space to roam. If anything it can create more behavioral problems.


The crate should be big enough for him to stretch out in, lay on its side and to sit or stand erect. Too large a crate can undermine housebreaking because your pet may eliminate at one end of the crate and lie down at the other. That will totally screw up housebreaking!!
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:31 AM
Edited by jazz_lover (99333) on 2011-05-05 10:32:36
My dog is about 9 months old. He has never gone number 2 in the house, other then the first few weeks of potty training. LLD, does that mixture lift old stains from the carpet too? If he has an accident when I am gone, and I don't see it...I don't want the pee to soak through the carpet and get "stuck".

Little dogs sure seem super hard to house train. All my previous 50+lbs dogs seemed to catch on much easier.

Renae, would you put food and water into the crate. I feel bad if he doesn't at least have some water.

re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By LlamaLlamaDuckmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:32 AM
it worked for old stains for me quite well... made the carpet look like new.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By ChristinePremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:34 AM
I've never done it myself, but I had a friend who used to put Pampers on her dog when she was a pup.

I'm sure my beast would chew them up, but maybe?

Keep On Dancing*
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By imadanseurPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 10:50 AM
^^Problem with that is that the dog will never be potty trained.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By MarlaSingermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 11:17 AM
I agree that the crate is a better option than a confined area of the apartment such as a bathroom or kitchen. We've tried both, and confining them in the kitchen was much worse. It created much more anxiety for the dog. The crate is their own little space where they can just curl up and go to sleep, and, like others have said, they go in their crates without being told to take naps, hide from loud noises, etc. We put blankets in their crates for them to snuggle up in, and we got water bottles that attach to their crates (like bottles for gerbils, guinea pigs, etc, but bigger).
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By LlamaLlamaDuckmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 11:33 AM
www.google.com . . .# It's not such a cage like crate and doubles as a piece of furniture.

We have 2 dogs on that is crate trained and one that isn't... No problems with the crate trained dog being unhappy and she is a husky.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By saor_celticmember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Thu May 05, 2011 02:31 PM
You'll want to start getting him used to not being outside all day long.

Additional potty training options would be to litter box train him or maybe get one of these, since he will go on the grass:
www.petco.com . . .


I have a Yorkie. He was impossible to potty train in the beginning. When I first got him at 6 months, I tried litter box training, but he would try and eat the pellets. Next I tried blocking him off in the kitchen because I didn't like the idea of crate training. He did not like that at all and would knock down the gate, or move it to the side and escape the kitchen and jump up onto the couch & I'd come home to my carpet being stained every day - I used Nature's Miracle - works great on carpet. Another option is Zep, which is a "high traffic" carpet cleaner. I use(d) both when needed.


As a last resort I did the crate training. Worked fantastically & I continued to use at my house up until about a year ago. I would also put the puppy pads around his crate in case he had to go, sometimes he would go "outside" the crate if he really couldn't hold it. One thing I did too, was put a webcam on him, so I could watch him while I was at work to make sure he was ok. I continued to use the webcam for awhile when I stopped crating him & now he has full range of the first floor during the day. I will still put out the puppy pads and he'll use those if he really has to go during the day, but for the most part he can hold it until we get home.

As far as food and water goes. Food - what's his feeding schedule? Do you feed him 1x a day? 2x a day? do you leave his food out for him throughout the day? I never put food in his crate, I tried and he just knocked it over and made a mess with it. So I'd feed him before he went into it and when I got home. If I was going to be gone really long, I had one of those gerbil water type dispensers, but for the most part I never put water in there either as he'd either knock it over or lay it it if I put a bowl in there. Now that he's not in the crate, I just leave water out for him all day, but I still stick to the am feeding and pm feeding.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By TuniePremium member
On Thu May 05, 2011 05:57 PM
jazz_lover wrote:

Little dogs sure seem super hard to house train. All my previous 50+lbs dogs seemed to catch on much easier.


Isn't that because smaller dogs have smaller bladders, thus making them unable to "hold it" for so long??

And EW, that Potty Patch thing sounds SO NASTY. DOUBLE EW.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By highlandrebelmember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Thu May 05, 2011 07:55 PM
I would try all of the things you listed and see what works best.

Crates are an excellent tool. Have you introduced him to a crate before?

I would try out the plastic and wire ones at your local petstore. Some dogs like being able to see out, while others like the security of the plastic.
I would avoid the wood ones if your dog may chew or have any separation anxiety.
If I remember right, your dog likes to chew so if he chews through the other crates you can get a heavier crate-
www.dogsupplies.com . . .



Isn't that because smaller dogs have smaller bladders, thus making them unable to "hold it" for so long??


It has nothing to do with the size of their bladder, they do have a smaller bladder but also drink less.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By Heartmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri May 06, 2011 04:17 PM
When dogs are in the wild, they live in dens. Literally, caves:
Image hotlink - 'http://zimbabwewilddogs.wildlifedirect.org/files/2010/10/at-the-den-mouth-300x214.jpg'
Zimbabwe Wild Dogs

When we domesticate dogs, crates are their dens. They like the small, confined space. It makes them feel safe. And, kind of like humans, they need a little place that's all their own.

When you first begin to crate train a dog, they will probably cry. When we first got our Zoe she would cry and cry whenever we put her in the crate and left the house. Now, if we're all busy and there's nothing else to do, she will voluntarily "put herself to bed" and go to her crate, curl up, and sleep. (So cute!)

The point of a crate is that the dog will not go to the bathroom in their own space. They'll hold it until you get home. After a while they get used to it. We've had Zoe for a little over a year and we don't usually crate her when we go out anymore. Only when we have guests over and she's being a nuisance, lol. (No, she does not go in as punishment!)

You can put water in the crate, that's up to you. Zoe is never in for extended periods of time so we don't usually do that. I would just put her water bowl in with her.

She has a plain metal crate and we pad the bottom with an old comforter. To distract her when we leave we'll toss a rawchide chew in too.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By ballerinatwirler
On Tue May 17, 2011 10:23 PM
My dog loves her crate and thinks of it as her bedroom. She will sometimes pass up sleeping with me to sleep in the crate. Luckily she is housebroken and can walk around on her own while I'm not home. I can't leave her in the crate for 8 hours though I'm a big baby and can't handle the thought of that however my stepmom german shepherd is crated 8 hours a day 5 days a week.

I would maybe try the kitchen since it's a bit bigger or the bathroom.
re: Moving into an apartment. What should I do for my dog?
By Luthmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sun Jun 05, 2011 05:26 PM
Tunie wrote:

jazz_lover wrote:

Little dogs sure seem super hard to house train. All my previous 50+lbs dogs seemed to catch on much easier.


Isn't that because smaller dogs have smaller bladders, thus making them unable to "hold it" for so long??

And EW, that Potty Patch thing sounds SO NASTY. DOUBLE EW.


Actually I have a Jack Russel and before I lived with my parents, she didnt have the freedom there to walk outside all day, now we live in my apartment where she has a bit more freedom to be outside, aka the balcony. I have 2 rugs in my apartment and she has NEVER peed or pooped on them. Infact she has never pooped inside the house ever,not at my parents and not here. One time she peed in my bed(she sleeps in bed with me) but that was only because after our late night walk she drank a whole bowl of water,something i need to make sure she doesnt do again. So small dogs can be housetrained yes. And she is a shelter dog too, she was abused by her former owner, and has traumatic problems, but peeing everywhere is not one of them. However if you would put her in a bench she would prolly bark the entire flat together, she would be so incredibly scared. So sometimes a bench is not a solution, i think it depends more on the dog itself (the history,behaviour etc) than whether its a big or a small dog.

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