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re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By Trout
On Thu Jun 09, 2011 01:28 PM
Jazzy, if you take those coins to the bank, they have change machines that you can use for no cost.

We all get frustrated, but you don't take it out on the poor customer service people.

Quoted for truth. If someone's being a real jerk, they shouldn't be allowed to get away with it.
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By Iamalittlefishie
On Thu Jun 09, 2011 07:44 PM
tassiemum wrote:



My now ex discharged a loan of $15 000 with $5 notes. The bank was not happy as, even though the notes were wrapped and had just come from another bank, they all had to be un-wrapped and hand counted. He just wanted to have a LOT of money for a short time.



*hijack*

My high school economics teacher told us a story about a business he used to run, and how he had made enough to upgrade his house, so he sold his house and got the money in cash. He got an armored car to bring it to his house and a police car to sit outside all night so he could have a room filled with money for a night to roll around in. This is now possibly one of my life goals.
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By Odessamember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Jun 09, 2011 08:42 PM
^BEST.

Erin.
::righteous babe::
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By Heartmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Jun 10, 2011 01:47 PM
Edited by Heart (21721) on 2011-06-10 13:51:22
Edited by Heart (21721) on 2011-06-10 13:53:38
I thought that United States currency was legal tender for all debts. Some businesses or governmental agencies say that they will only accept checks, money orders or credit cards as payment, and others will only accept currency notes in denominations of $20 or smaller. Isn't this illegal?

The pertinent portion of law that applies to your question is the Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, entitled "Legal tender," which states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues."

This statute means that all United States money as identified above are a valid and legal offer of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person or an organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services. Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in pennies or dollar bills. In addition, movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations may refuse to accept large denomination currency (usually notes above $20) as a matter of policy.

Source: United States Department of the Treasury


I once had someone pay over $10 in change at work. It was various coins, mostly quarters. I was so pissed, but it was legal tender and I don't know our policy, but I think we accept all money, any money, so I had to stand there and count it. You can bet I did not thank that customer for shopping at my store.

Banks and cash offices usually have machines for counting out bills and coins, so it's less of a deal, though still annoying.

Now that I think of it, I did something similar to this once. The LIRR ticket machines give you change in gold dollar coins. I had a bunch of these in my wallet just taking up space, so I wound up paying for a visit to Planned Parenthood with them, to the dismay of the reluctant cashier. (I think it might've been something like $15.) I just wanted to get rid of them. I then got pissed about something - can't remember what now, it was complicated, they refused to accept my medical records from another PP clinic or something - and asked for my money back, made a scene, and stormed out. The cashier looked very happy to give me my coins back. I was a total ass, it was great. I think I wound up taking the Sacajaweas to the bank to swap them out for dollar bills.



On that note, however, now I want to pay off my student loans in unrolled pennies... *beardstroke*
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By Sumayah
On Fri Jun 10, 2011 02:19 PM
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2011-06-10 14:20:46
Edited by Sumayah (204191) on 2011-06-10 14:21:37 pennies suma not prinnys
I've been the customer behind the one paying in change. B and I were at Toys'r'us buying an arcade xbox 360 and the kid in front of us was buying a $60 dollar game. His mother watched him uncork his piggy bank and dump all his change on the counter. The clerk behind the counter had this incredulous look on his face, he looked up at us behind the mom and son, looked down at the pile of random change, looked back at us and asked what we needed. We told him we had planned on getting a 360 but it seemed he'd be busy for a while and we'd come back another time. Truth told, we went to Best Buy. I get that the kid wanted to pay with his own money, but mom should have taken him to the bank, had it turned into bills. Letting him pay with pennies and nickles and dimes and quarters for a $60 was irresponsible and cost toys'r'us a sale.
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By pokomember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Jun 11, 2011 08:03 PM
Every now and then I'll pay for something that like $5 in a bunch of shrappers, but I always apologise over and over for being a pain...
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By Odessamember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Jun 11, 2011 08:31 PM
I have jockeyed a register in a supermarket, and the people who pay all in coins are my absolute favourite customers.

There is NEVER enough change ordered from upstairs to deal with the large volume of cash payments we get, and I often run out of coins during a shift, so when someone comes in and wants to pay for $40 of shopping with all coins, it's a bit annoying cause I have to count them all, but it replenishes my drawer and means I don't have to call my supervisor and get shouted at for running out of change. I once got told by my supervisor when I had run out of 5 and 10 cent coins that I should ask customers for change. I was like "Whaa? We're a national supermarket chain, not the Salvation Army - I shouldn't be begging change from my customers!"

I've never had a customer just dump it all on my counter either - they always count it out into little piles for me, which makes my life much easier too.

Erin.
::righteous babe::
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By BeautifulMistakemember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Sun Jun 12, 2011 12:24 PM
I only think it was wrong how the person did it. But change is STILL money so why shouldn't you be able to pay with it? Just because it may be a bit annoying, at least they're paying instead of trying to steal it...

In the case of the little kid buying a $60 game with change...I agree the mother should have helped him count through it all and at least put it into rolls. My cousin is a bartender so she gets tons and tons of change and she rolls it all and will use that to pay for things. Nobody has ever had a problem with that.

Personally I only use change when I'm buying something under $5 or so and it's usually loonies, toonies and quarters. So very easy stuff to count.

I do remember when my brother was in high school and fundraising for grad we always do an elimination draw and tickets are $20 each and my aunt decided to be a goof and pay for a ticket in pennies or something like that. Whatever. As long as you pay. :P

Money is money. Don't complain. At least you're getting the money instead of somebody stealing it.
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By RileyA
On Wed Jun 15, 2011 06:35 AM
I don't think there should be a fine if it is legal tender in the US.

In Australia we phased out 1 cent pieces in the 80's and 2 cent pieces were gone in the the early 90's.

Our coins now are 5 cents, 10 cents, 20 cents, 50 cents, 1 dollar and 2 dollars. Then from $5 and above we have notes.

Now they are planning on phasing out 5 cent pieces too, so 10 cents will be our smallest coin.
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By UberGoobermember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Wed Jun 15, 2011 06:41 AM
The kid with the piggy bank blows my mind. Have these people never been to a bank?! Take your kid to the bank when it isn't busy and ask to see the coin machine. COOLEST DEVICE EVER!!!! I cannot descrie in words how incredibly amazing this machine was as a child and the intense satisfaction received by turning my $14 in change into grown-up dollar bills. Parents these days....
re: Should you be able to pay for things with pennies? Are pennies legal tender?
By hylndlasmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Aug 27, 2011 08:10 AM
For the person asking.....you can also take your change to some grocery stores and use Coin Star to get them in bills.

However they do charge a fee and it's rather high.


I'm of two minds on this. The guy was a DB for the jerky way he paid, but I'm not sure he should have been fined for it. I do think some sort of slap on the wrist would have been appropriate though just because the guy was a jerk about it....but that is just me.
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