Forum: Arts / Pets

Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Thu Aug 11, 2011 08:22 PM
Edited by imadanseur (79325) on 2011-08-11 21:31:00 the title needed a little work.

My friend is quite into horseback riding, but she has never had experience with a Arabian Horse. She and her family has owned quite a bit of horses, but they don't have experience with the Arabian Horse

She is worried that they Spook easily.

Anyone have experience riding them and owning them as pets?

8 Replies to Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??

re: Does anyone dislike Arabs?
By ConUnaSonrisamember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Thu Aug 11, 2011 09:30 PM
We have an Arabian and yeah, she is pretty skittish and spooks easily, but I think it just comes down to the individual horse. You'll find skittish horses and calm horses in any breed. With our Arabian, she's also 23 years old and blind in one eye, so I'm sure that has a lot to do with her skittishness. I'd be on edge too if I couldn't see very well lol. She was a school horse in her prime, so I'm sure she used to be calmer. Like I said, it all comes down to the individual horse's personality; I don't think the breed matters that much.
re: Does anyone dislike Arabs?
By Chaconnemember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Thu Aug 11, 2011 09:44 PM
The proper title for this discussion would be "Arabians" since you are refering to the breed of horses. The term "Arabs" is never applied to the horses in the English translation. The Arabs (people) are strictly speaking the decendents of Arabian peninsula tribes collectively called "the Arabs." The term "Arabs" (tribe) appears in the Hebrew Bible.
It is a proper noun. The adjectival form "Arabian" describes a multitude of things which originated in the Arabian peninsula, including horses.

BTW, the term is misapplied to most peoples who call themselves Arabs EXCEPT for those who actually come from the Arabian Peninsula e.g. Saudi Arabians, Kuwaiti, Omanis, Yemenites and the denizens of the various Gulf States such as the United Arab Emirates. North Africans and Levantines (Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordanians and Palestinians) of course speak Arabic today as a result of seventh century conquests by the followers of Muhammad, but ethnically few are actually Arabs in the technical interpretation of the world. The ruling house of Jordan, however, is actually Arabian as the present king is the fourth generation in a line of rulers, called the Hashemites, who once ruled the western portion of the Arabian Peninsula including Mecca. The Brits created Jordan for the sole purpose of creating a kingdom for one of the three sons of the early 20th Century ruler, Hussein of Mecca. Another son became the King of Iraq, another territory created by the Brits. This line died (literally) in a 1958 coup d'etat. A third son was to rule Syria, but that never happened. [Some of this actually goes back to the Lawrence of Arabia story.] The Saudis are actually an Eastern Arabian tribe which conquered most of Arabia in the aftermath of World War One.

These are English (and other European) language conventions. The linguistic variations are more subtle in Arabic, but the horse is described by an adjectival form somewhat different that the form used to describe the Arabian people. (I've forgotten most of the Arabic I ever knew, but it appears to have something to do with the gender of the words for "horse" and the gender of the word for "people.")

Jon
re: Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Thu Aug 11, 2011 09:47 PM
Very interesting Jon. I always learn new information from you.

Elizabeth, how old was your horse when you first got it?
re: Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??
By highlandrebelmember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Aug 12, 2011 12:03 AM
Arabian horses are often called 'Arabs' in the horse world, regardless of it being politically or linguistically correct.



I would suggest your friend learn more about horses and horse behavior in general. I don't know if she is looking at buying an Arab or just wondering about the breed.

Buying or avoiding buying based on breed is bad.

Every individual horse has a unique personality, and that is largely based on its training, environment, and experiences. Arabs are a hot breed, but hot does not equal spooky.
re: Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??
By YumYumDoughnutPremium member
On Fri Aug 12, 2011 12:38 AM
Edited by jazz_lover (99333) on 2011-08-12 00:42:19
^ She actually owns horses and hold a few titles in show jumping. She has never owned Arabs, and she wanted to get information about them. She noticed that they have problems jumping, but I am not sure if that is specific to the breed.

She doesn't do much endurance riding, so having a Arab wouldn't make a difference.

She wouldn't be competing with the horse, I think she just wants one as a pet. She already has a horse that she competes with.
re: Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??
By highlandrebelmember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Aug 12, 2011 03:32 AM
Having horses and holding a few titles does not equal knowledge.
She should be able to get on the horse, ride for a bit, do some ground work and have a pretty good idea if they will be a good match. Breed is fairly irrelevant.

Is she looking for a pasture ornament or a trail type of horse?

Arabs are not used too often in show jumping simply because of their small stature. There are quite a few Anglo-Arabs in how jumping though. I did eventing on an Arab and did pretty well. Small horse but she had a lot of heart.
re: Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??
By ConUnaSonrisamember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Fri Aug 12, 2011 07:53 AM
Lauren I think she was 14 or 15 years old when we got her; can't exactly remember.
re: Does anyone dislike Arabian Horses??
By hylndlasmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Fri Aug 12, 2011 04:45 PM
Edited by hylndlas (107168) on 2011-08-12 16:47:02 .
I have a lot of experience with Arabians....and yes in the horse world they are called Arabs but I digress.

It really depends on the horse. I took care of some (all ages) that were so laid back my 3 year old sister could lead them around and I also took care of a few that were VERY high strung. However I've run across this with other breeds as well (Quarter horses, Appaloosas,Palominos, mustangs, etc.)

Any horse (even breeds who are known to be fairly laid back) can be skittish and or high strung. It really depends on the horse! They have different personalities just like us humans! :)

Does your friend know that Arabian Stallions are one of the few breeds where the United States Equestrian Federation rules allow children to exhibit stallions in nearly all show ring classes, including those limited to riders under 18?

This is because only Arabian horses with a naturally good disposition were allowed to reproduce, with the result that most Arabians today have a good temperament. There are some exceptions to this of course (again the temperament of the individual horse) some are more high strung than others....but again it depends on the horse.



I too think your friend is doing a disservice to these wonderful horses by outright dismissing them. One of the sweetest boys I had the pleasure of riding and taking care of was an Arab. He would follow me around like a BIG DOG if I let him. I sure do miss that boy!! :(

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