Forum: Arts / Debates

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re: Should a Dog Who Attacked a Human be Put Down?
By Heartmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sat Feb 11, 2012 11:30 PM
I would like to throw in that dog aggression and human aggression are two COMPLETELY different things.

My dog is a pit/Staff mutt and as I believe I mentioned on here before, she is aggressive to dogs but not to humans. I don't think I've EVER see her growl or snarl at another person. But she does not like other dogs. I don't worry at all about introducing her to a new person - she might jump up in excitement, but that's typical. If I know she's going to be around other dogs, she's going to be short-leashed and I'm going to be watching her every second. My family could try socializing her, but we're not around other dogs very often and trainers have told us that it's probably no going to help very much. This has nothing to do with her breed and everything to do with the fact that she spent the first 7 months of her life on the streets of Camden County. She had to be aggressive in order to stay alive.

Staffordshire terriers, a certain kind of pitbull, are actually known as "nanny dogs" because they're sooo good with people and children in particular. They tend to be more aggressive towards dogs, but they're recommended for families with young kids.


Opinions can't be right or wrong... but facts certainly can be. It's been proven time and time again that breeds are not the cause of dog aggression.
re: Should a Dog Who Attacked a Human be Put Down?
By Luthmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Sun Feb 12, 2012 12:58 PM
All im gonna add is that i dont blame an entire breed for being aggresive, there are always exceptions.
re: Should a Dog Who Attacked a Human be Put Down?
By d4jmember has saluted, click to view salute photosPremium member
On Tue Feb 14, 2012 11:01 PM
That reporter got seventy stitches in her face and her mouth is stitched shut! Just looking at the still image at the top of the video just terrifies me.

news.yahoo.com . . .

I didn't even witness my husband's attack and I find that here it is some time later and I'm finding that I'm definitely more afraid of dogs. I didn't think it would have that affect on me but it has.

I don't think the dog that bit the reporter should be put down. BUT it had better be under better control by its owner in order for it to remain in his home. Because even if the reporter was an idiot for getting in the animal's face you have to assume as an owner that people may be idiots around your dog and keep it completely under your control Especially an animal of that size and strength!
re: Should a Dog Who Attacked a Human be Put Down?
By highlandrebelmember has saluted, click to view salute photos
On Wed Feb 15, 2012 12:17 PM
d4j wrote:

That reporter got seventy stitches in her face and her mouth is stitched shut! Just looking at the still image at the top of the video just terrifies me.

news.yahoo.com . . .


I don't think the dog that bit the reporter should be put down. BUT it had better be under better control by its owner in order for it to remain in his home. Because even if the reporter was an idiot for getting in the animal's face you have to assume as an owner that people may be idiots around your dog and keep it completely under your control Especially an animal of that size and strength!


I agree with you completely. The dogs owner is very much at fault. The series of events created a 'perfect storm'.

The owner allowed his dog to run off leash, the dog chased a coyote into a frozen lake and the coyote drown. Then a rescue effort was launched to get Max out of the frozen lake.
Instead of going to a vet or allowing his dog to relax and de-stress, the owner immediately brought a camera crew into his home.
Then went on KUSA less than 24 hours later.

The signs of stress were very clear, just from the still of the video you can see 'whale eye' (the half moon white of the dogs eye), stress panting, ears laid back and a general feeling of unease. Dogs don’t “bite without warning,” they bite when all their warning signals go unheeded.
A dog's cortisol level spikes at the moment something stressful happens (in this case it could have even been seeing the coyote that set off the initial spike, who knows) and doesn't return to the normal level range for 72 hours. So, this dog was actually measurably stressed when he did the interview.
He was not intending to harm the anchor, to me that is clear. He was simply trying to get her out of his space which he attempted to do very nicely and appropriately at first. But his signals were ignored. He was in many ways not given any other choice than to bite - and it was clearly an inhibited bite.

The problem almost always comes down to people's ignorance of canine body language. If kids learned in school how to properly greet a dog (ie. NOT sticking your hand out to let them sniff) and the signs of when to leave a dog alone, I feel there would be far fewer bites.
Just putting a dog down is rarely the best answer, because in our throw away society, the owner will blame what happened on the dog and get a new one.
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